Exhaust Clamps versus Welding

Fitting together the different parts of your car’s exhaust system can be a tricky business. You want to make sure that all the parts are fitted securely and that you are not leaking in any places.

Exhaust Clamps versus Welding
Exhaust Clamps

Like everything that has to do with cars, gearheads all have their own methods and products that they swear by: some will tell you to weld, others will tell you to use clamps.

With all these opinions flying around, what is the best option for your exhaust system? In this article we are going to give you some pros and cons of each method and fill you in on how to clamp your own exhaust system at home.


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What is welding?
Welding is a technique of joining two pieces of metal together. The most common types of welding are Flux-cored arc welding, stick welding, TIG welding, and MIG welding. Each of these work differently and use different electrodes to get the job done.

Welding vs Exhaust Clamps
Welding

There are many ways to use each type of welding, and the method used depends on the types of metals and the purpose of the finished piece.

You would use different methods, for example, to weld a car exhaust system than you would for a cool lawn art statue.

What are exhaust clamps?

Exhaust clamps are metal parts used to hold parts together with pressure.

They can be tightened or loosened to fit different sizes of equipment and parts. You can find many types of clamps, but usually for a vehicle’s exhaust pipe you would look for band clamps, V-band clamps, and U-bolt clamps.

Some exhaust parts will clamp onto your cars exhaust easily.

Installing mufflers and catalytic converters is commonly done with clamps. If you make sure to use the right seals, you can prevent the escape of any air or fumes from your exhaust system.

Exhaust Clamps
Exhaust Clamps

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Pros and Cons

Welding: the Pros

  • Welded metal looks professionally done
  • Welding the pieces of your exhaust system can create a long-lasting bond
  • The connections in the joints of the exhaust system will be stronger
  • Prevention of leakage in the seams

Welding: the Cons

  • Requires trained, skilled professionals. Amateur jobs can do more harm than good if they are done incorrectly
  • Requires special equipment
  • Very difficult to separate parts once they are properly welded together
Welding
Welding

Exhaust Clamps: the Pros

  • No special equipment required. All you need is a screwdriver or a wrench
  • Removeable and reusable. If you want a new part, you can loosen and remove the clamp and use it again
  • Easy. You don’t need special training to operate a clamp. Any amateur can do it

Exhaust Clamps: the Cons

  • Large variety of clamp options, so you might scratch your head looking at the selection
  • May need tightening periodically

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The lowdown: Our take on Exhaust Clamps

Overall, clamping your exhaust is a much easier and cheaper way to secure your exhaust system than welding.

Although a welded exhaust system sure looks more secure, you are not making much of a sacrifice if you clamp it instead: With the right sealing and proper tightening, clamps can have just as secure a hold as welded fixtures.

Plus, you can install clamps in your own home garage.

Exhaust Clamps Guide
Exhaust Clamps

You should jack up the car with a specialized jack, always making sure to have a spare tire or a specialized protector in place in case the car should fall while you are working under it.

Once the car is jacked up, you will have plenty of space to work under it and install your new pipe or muffler. Once it is in place, you can listen for the sound of air escaping to find any leaks.

We hope this article has been helpful, and we hope that you can make your car run better than ever!

Related Post: Best MIG Welders

Welder | Bestseller

Bestseller No. 1
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Last update on 2021-05-18 / Most affiliate links and/or Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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