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Compound Miter Saw Saws

DEWALT DW716XPS Compound Miter Saw Review

Miter saws are one of the most convenient types of saws available. They make producing repeatable cuts a cinch by eliminating the need to readjust the saw head, angle, and fence after every cut. A compound miter saw takes it to the next level by allowing users to make repeated compound cuts (mitered and beveled cuts) in no time at all.

DEWALT DW716XPS Compound Miter Saw with XPS Review

One of the more popular compound miter saws out there is the DW716XPS from DEWALT. This saw is known for its tremendous power, high-speed blade, and amazing positioning system that ensures you’re making precision cuts every time. Let’s take a closer look at what the DW716XPS is packing and how well it works.


XPS (Cross-Positioning System)

Without any lights or lasers, it can be quite challenging to gauge how much material will be removed. The kerf (thickness) of the blade determines the width of the cut so it’s extremely important that you know just how wide the cut will end up being. Normally, miter saws come with lasers which give a somewhat accurate picture of where the blade will penetrate your piece, but the main problem with lasers is that they often don’t match the kerf of the blade, especially if you purchased a laser add-on separately.

DEWALT’s ingenious system – the XPS module – projects a bright LED light on both sides of the blade, creating a shadow that darkens and becomes more defined as the blade moves closer to the workpiece. The thickness of the shadow is also extremely similar to the kerf of the saw blade so users can get a clear idea of how much material will be removed. In our opinion, DEWALT’s XPS trumps any laser system out there. Of course, the only drawback is if you’re working outdoors where sunlight shines directly on your piece.

DEWALT DW716XPS Compound Miter Saw Review

Motor Power and Speed

The DW716XPS is equipped with a large 15-amp motor which delivers a ton of power for chopping through all types of wood. It spins the huge 12-inch blade at speeds of up to 3,800 RPM for quick, clean cuts through wide boards. For portable compound miter saws, this is the largest motor you’ll ever need, and anything more powerful can be overkill.

Miter and Bevel Capacities

This compound miter saw has a maximum mitering capacity of 50° in both directions. The mitering system has 11 pre-installed positive stops to help make repeated cuts at the most commonly used angles. The DW716XPS also has a beveling head that can tilt in both directions at up to 48°. Apart from the 0° position, each direction has three positive stops at 33.9°, 45°, and 48°.

Cutting Capacity

The 12-inch blade that comes with the DW716XPS can deliver deep cuts on wide boards, making it an extremely useful tool for all sorts of woodworking projects. While the blade is at the 90° position, it can cut boards up to 8 inches wide and 6.5 inches thick. While mitered at 45°, the 12-inch blade can cut 4 inches deep on 6-inch wide stock. For cutting through crown molding in the nested position, the DW716XPS can cut as deep as 6-5/8 inches with a single plunge.

DEWALT DW716XPS Compound Miter Saw

Dust Collection Bag

Like any woodworking tool, a compound miter saw produces huge mounds of sawdust in just a couple of passes. Luckily, miter saws like the DW71XPS feature a handy dust collection bag that attached to a 2-1/2-inch dust port located on its backside. The dust bag doesn’t leak but can fill up rather quickly if you’re using the tool continuously so consider attaching a shop vac hose to this unit’s dust port. Adapters are available (but sold separately) if your shop vac doesn’t use a 2-1/2-inch hose.

Electric Brakes

Miter saws should come with a wide range of safety features like retractable blade guards and lockout triggers. But the one feature we think not enough miter saws come with – the DW716XPS not included – is electric brakes. Basically, when the trigger is disengaged, the DW716XPS’s saw blade will stop almost instantaneously. This means while the blade is slightly above the surface of your material and fully exposed, after releasing the trigger you’ll have a reduced risk of cutting your forearm.

Verdict

In all honesty, the DeWalt DW716XPS is like so many other 12-inch compound miter saws out there in terms of maximum cutting capacities, mitering and beveling ranges, and safety features. However, the thing that really sets this tool apart is the XPS module which helps give operators a clear idea of the blade’s kerf and how much material will be removed. This feature alone is definitely worth the cost of the tool if you’re serious about woodworking.

DEWALT DW716XPS



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Compound Miter Saw Saws

Bosch Dual Bevel Axial-Glide Compact Miter Saw Review

Miters saws are one of the most time-saving tools you could own. Their versatility makes them an excellent choice for performing intricate straight cuts through wide pieces of lumber. Compound and sliding compound miter saws take it several steps further and give you the ability to cut on two planes through wider boards.

Bosch Dual Bevel Axial-Glide Compact Miter Saw, CM10GD Review

The Bosch CM10GD goes beyond what a regular sliding compound miter saw can do. It comes with space-saving features that significantly reduce the amount of required clearance to draw the saw head forward. Now let’s see what else the CM10GD is packing.


Axial-Glide Arm

You might be wondering why the CM10GD isn’t called a sliding compound miter saw. After all, the saw head “slides” forward and backward to increase the saw’s cutting capacity. However, the saw head doesn’t slide like in sliding miter saws, but instead, it is directed by a gliding arm.

The main difference between “sliding” and “gliding” is that the CM10GD’s axial-glide arm doesn’t require the use of long rails that protrude from the back-end of the tool. This means you can push this tool up against the wall without having to worry about whether or how far the saw head can move.

Bosch Dual Bevel Axial-Glide Compact Miter Saw, CM10GD

Fence

One feature that most people overlook is the fence. The CM10GD has a two-piece fence; a fixed lower fence and an extendable upper fence. The markings on the fences are easy to read for precise repetitive cuts. However, the design of the saw has one major flaw in regards to the design of the fence. While the extendable fence is closed (not extended outwards), then it’s possible that the saw blade can cut through it. This is, in our opinion, a major flaw that the operator needs to be aware of as not to cause any damage to the unit.

Cutting Capacities

Due to the mitering and beveling nature of this miter saw, there is a wide range of different cutting capacities to take into consideration.

First, with the saw head positioned at 90°, the 10-inch blade can cut boards up to 8 inches thick and 12 inches wide. When angled at 45° in either direction, the saw can crosscut boards up to 8 inches wide. While the blade is tilted at 45°, it can blocks up to 4-1/2 inches thick.

Bosch CM10GD Review

Precision Lock

It’s not uncommon to find that the miter gauge needs some fine-tuning to get the saw head at the desired angle. However, that is not the case with the CM10GD. Straight out of the box, the CM10GD’s miter gauge will be perfectly set so you can get straight to making compound cuts.

The miter gauge has positive stops at 0°, 15°, 22.5°, 31.6°, and 45° in both directions. There are also positive bevel stops set at 0°, 33.9°, and 45° to the left and right.

Dust Collection

It’s extremely important that you keep your miter saw free of sawdust at all times. When dust goes airborne, it can settle underneath power tools which could become a fire hazard. The CM10GD comes with a collection bag that captures 90% of the produced sawdust. There’s also a 1-1/4-inch dust port to connect a shop vac.

Bosch CM10GDe Compact Miter Saw

Performance

Despite all of the CM10GD’s features, there are some pretty significant drawbacks to this tool.

The first thing we noticed is that the axial-glide arm doesn’t is a bit wobbly. This translates into imperfect straight cuts which could ruin the cut-edge of your board. The arm moves straight when it’s coming forward (toward the user) but then angles slightly away as it retracts.

Another thing we’ve found is that the dust collection bag doesn’t seem to want to hold onto all of the dust. It’s a bit too porous and leaks sawdust everywhere behind the tool. If you get this tool, we recommend connecting a shop vac for maximum dust collection.

Bosch Dual Bevel Axial-Glide Compact Miter Saw

Portability

Something that all professional handymen are looking for is portable tools. The CM10GD weighs 65 pounds which is quite heavy by portable miter saw standards. However, keep in mind that this tool has a small footprint so it won’t take up too much space when loading it onto your truck. To increase the tool’s portability, you can get the Bosch folding miter saw stand (sold separately) which comes with caster wheels for easy movability.

Verdict

There’s no denying that this is a great miter saw from Bosch. The lightweight, compact design makes it a noteworthy sliding/gliding compound miter saw for professional and hobby use. There are some rather significant downsides, such as the angled retracting trajectory of the saw head and the fact that the saw can end up damaging its own fence. However, with extra care, this could be an extremely valuable tool for your workshop or to take to the job site.

Bosch Compact Miter Saw, CM10GD Review



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A-Check Compound Miter Saw Saws

Best Compound Miter Saw Reviews

A woodworking shop is never complete if it doesn’t contain a miter saw. A miter saw is a saw with a circular blade attached to a head which plunges downward with a pull of the lever. The size a miter saw’s blade allows it to make a clean cut through thick boards in a single pass.

The main function of a miter saw is to cut your boards at a wide range of different angles. Many models have the ability to be mitered up to 50° to the left and right. Admittedly, you could do this on a table saw or eye it with a circular saw, but the miter saw’s straightforward setup makes it a heck of a lot easier to produced angle cuts.

The main benefit that a miter saw offers is the ability to make repeated cuts across numerous boards with just a single setup. You don’t need to readjust the tilt of the blade or the stops; simply push your board against the fence and pull down on the saw head. Easy as pie.


What is a Compound Miter Saw?

Like any good woodworking tool, miter saws come in a wide variety of shapes and with various features. The most basic of miter saws let you cut at an angle by swinging the saw head left or right before plunging it into the board.

However, what if you want to cut on two planes – at an angle through the wood and at an angle into the woodA basic miter saw won’t give you the ability to tilt or bevel the saw head, so you can either spin your board around to attempt this dangerous cut, or you can get a compound miter saw.

The only distinguishing factor between miter saws and compound miter saws is that the latter has a beveling saw head. Apart from swinging the saw head left or right, you can tilt it to produce beveled cuts into your piece.

Being able to make compound cuts into your workpieces is useful when making crown molding, picture frames, and furniture with fancy joints. It’s definitely a handy feature to have. No longer will you need to rely on miter jigs to produce the right compound cut.

What to Look for in a Compound Miter Saw

In this section, we’ll talk about the various features and specs to be on the lookout for when choosing a compound miter saw.

Motor Power

In a nutshell, a more powerful motor means better cutting power. When looking at potential compound miter saws, be sure to check out the motor’s amperage. Around 15 amps should be more than sufficient for cutting through thick boards with a single plunge. Of course, this depends on what you plan on cutting. If you work exclusively on delicate thin pieces like crown molding, then a 9-amp motor would do you just fine.

Blade Size

This is another thing to pay close attention to. The size of the blade determines how thick a board it can cut with a single pass. A smaller blade forces you to turn the workpiece over in order to finish the cut. The most common sizes are 8 inches, 10 inches, and 12 inches. The saw should have a beefy motor if it’s equipped with a 12-inch blade.

Miter and Bevel Capacities

The saw head of a compound miter should swing at least up to 45° in both directions. Even though you can simply turn your board over to produce an identical angle cut on the other side, being able to turn the saw makes the process much quicker to do. As for the bevel capacity, a compound miter saw should tilt at least 45° to one side.

Positive Stops

Positive stops are points set by the manufacturer that let you adjust and lock the saw on a particular angle. They help in reducing the amount of time needed to adjust the saw head’s cutting angle. Some models even let you adjust the angle – both swivel and tilt – with your thumb, increasing your work speed even further.

Dust Blower and Collection Bag

One of the worst things that can happen in a woodshop is inhaling sawdust. To prevent sawdust from going airborne, a compound miter saw – a tool that produces dust by the tons – should come equipped with a dust blower to shoo the sawdust to away from your workstation. It should also feature a dust collection bag at the backside of the saw head to gather as much as possible. However, when operating any woodworking tool, you should wear a respirator at all times.

Laser Guide

A laser guide helps in determining where the blade will penetrate into your workpiece. The problem with many models is that the vibrations of a rapidly spinning blade and repeated plunges can shift the laser from its original position, rendering it utterly useless for future cuts. Check to see where the laser is located and how well it’s built into the tool to prevent it from moving.

Blade Guard

One of the most reliable safety features of a compound miter saw is the blade guard. Since you need to get the blade rotating at full speed before plunging it into your workpiece, the blade should be completely encased in a transparent guard. As the saw head moves downward, the guard will retract, exposing the saw just inches away from your stock to reduce the possibility of injury. As you raise the saw head, the blade should return to its original position.

Electric Brakes

This is another safety feature to be on the lookout for. Electric brakes immediately prevent the flow of electricity into the saw’s motor as soon as you release the trigger. The blade will then stop spinning within two seconds. Without electric brakes, it would take even longer for the blade to come to a complete stop.

Final Remarks
A compound miter saw can be a handy tool to have in the workshop. It lets you produce angled cuts and beveled cuts with a single plunge of the saw head. The ability to make these compound cuts helps in making simple and complex pieces of wood-based art such as picture frames, crown molding, and furniture. Many of the features to look out for are similar to those of a simple miter saw; the difference being the beveling capacity or how far the blade can tilt in one or both directions.



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A-Check Compound Miter Saw Guides Info Guides Saws

Best Sliding Compound Miter Saw Uses

If you thought a regular miter saw was great, wait until you get your hands on a sliding compound miter saw. No other tool can beat the simplicity that a sliding compound miter saw provides in crosscutting wide boards. With one of these in your workshop, complicated carpentry projects can be done in a jiffy.

What is a Sliding Compound Miter Saw?

Before we go too far, let’s talk about the sliding compound miter saw.

A sliding compound miter saw is like a compound miter saw in how the head can tilt to the left and right to produce compound cuts (beveled and mitered). The most prominent feature and the one that separates it from classic compound miter saws is the sliding saw head. By tugging on the head, you can extend the capacity of the saw to cut wider boards in a single pass. No more flipping boards to complete cuts.


Do I need one?

The real benefit that a sliding compound miter saw offers is convenience. When using a miter saw, crosscutting lumber hardly requires any adjustments in the tool. Simply tweak the miter and bevel of the saw and plunge the blade into your piece. Sliding compound miter saws take it to another level by extending its reach to crosscut wider boards.

Is it possible to produce mitered, beveled, and compound cuts using other sawsOf course. A handheld circular saw, and table saw can do anything that a miter saw can do. The drawback of using these tools over sliding compound miter saw is the amount of time used to set the angle of the blade properly. As for table saws, you’ll need to either purchase a miter jig or construct your own. These are relatively inexpensive to buy or make, so if you’re on tight on cash and already have a table saw in your workshop, then the more cost-effective thing to do would be to get a miter jig.

Best Uses of a Sliding Compound Miter Saw

There are four main jobs that a sliding compound miter saw is designed to do. Using any other type of saw can be inconvenient or impossible to match the precision of one of these saws. Although there are numerous things you can do with a sliding compound miter saw, we’re only going to talk about the following.

Crosscuts

If you need to cut a long board into multiple pieces, a miter saw will almost always be the optimal tool of choice. Other saws worth mentioning include handsaws, radial arm saws, table saws, and circular saws. However, sliding compound miters trump all others saws for the following reasons.

First, a sliding compound miter saw packs a powerful motor. It’s highly unlikely that you’ll come across a type of wood that a sliding compound miter saw can’t handle. Also, this saw is heavy yet portable so you can mount it onto a workbench for extra stability. The amount of clearance on either side of the tool is dependent on any size restrictions of your workshop.

Second, sliding compound miter saws are extremely user-friendly. Lining up boards is a simple matter of pushing the piece against the fence. You can check where the saw will penetrate the surface of the board by pulling the sawhead down and resting the blade onto the piece. Some models come with laser guides, but they’re not always reliable, and vibrations can knock the laser out of position.

The third reason is the cutting capacity of a sliding compound miter saw. One of these tools equipped with a 12-inch blade can crosscut a 12-inch wide board in a single sweep, though it depends on the thickness.

Angled Cuts

There are hardly any woodworking projects that don’t require making angled cuts, or mitered cuts (hence the name of the tool). You can make mitered cuts simply by swinging the sawhead to the left or right. Many models have mitering capacities of up to 50° in one or both directions, while others can go beyond the 50° mark. The swinging sawhead will come in handy in a number of situations, including but not limited to trim work and flooring.

Compound Cuts

This is one of the more complicated cuts that you will hardly ever need to produce. However, when the time comes to make compound cuts for crown molding and other trim, you’ll be glad that your workshop is equipped with a sliding compound miter saw. Compound cuts are when you both miter and tilt the saw head to redirect the angling path of the cut. The sawheads on sliding compound miter saws can bevel in both directions and typically up to 45°.

Repeatable Cuts

Like any good stationary saw, a sliding compound miter saw is great at producing repeatable cuts. You can lock the bevel and miter angles of the sawhead to keep it from shifting as you plunge the blade over and over again. Utilize the saw’s fence by clamping scrap pieces of wood to serve as stops. This will help you cut long boards down to identical lengths without having to measure and re-measure the board repeatedly.

Portable

Even though sliding compound miter saws are stationary units, it doesn’t mean that they’re not portable. The weight of this tool is typically around 80 to 100 pounds or so, so loading it onto your truck shouldn’t be too difficult. When you need to cut boards down to size at the job site, a sliding compound miter saw will be the much more convenient tool to take with you compared to full-sized table saws and circular saws.

Final Remarks

The main differences between traditional miter saws and sliding compound miters saws are its ability to produce compound cuts and cut through wide boards in a single pass. To some, a sliding compound miter saw might be a luxury tool that they won’t need very often, and we really can’t argue with that fact. However, the true luxury of a sliding compound miter saw is the convenience it provides when making repeatable cuts across long or numerous boards without any additional adjustments.



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Compound Miter Saw Guides Info Guides Saws

Best Compound Miter Saw Uses

The miter saw is a type of saw that uses a plunging head to crosscut through the wood. With the right type of blade, you can even use a miter saw to chop metal pipes and bars, but there is a separate species of the miter saw designed exclusively for metalwork.

Best Compound Miter Saw Uses

Over time, the miter saw has evolved from being a one-trick pony from just plunging and making angled cuts into a more complex beast. The compound miter saw is the “second stage” of the miter saw evolution with the added ability to bevel the head in a single direction. This lets the user produce cuts in two planes so you can make a compound cut with a single plunge of the saw head.

A compound miter saw isn’t often regarded as a must-have tool for the average workshop, especially when put head-to-head against other miter saw models like the dual-compound miter saw and sliding compound miter saw, but it does have a ton of uses. In this article, we’ll describe what the average user can do with a compound miter saw.

Crosscutting

Let’s talk about what a compound miter saw can do that a regular miter saw does. The first is cross-cutting. Compound miter saws need to be placed in a spot in your workshop with enough clearance to the and right sides. This lets you balance long boards across the work surface. With a miter saw, all you need to do is align the board correctly beneath the saw head before plunging the blade by pulling down on the handle.

Lining the board against the fence and making measurements is easy to do with a miter saw. The fence sits perpendicular to the saw’s work table, and you can put in your own measurement markings on both sides of the tool as references for measuring the sizes of the boards after making the crosscut.

Compound Miter Saw Uses

You can accomplish the same type of cut on a table saw, but with the right supports, you can crosscut boards that surpass the capacity of a table saw’s work surface. However, you’re limited to how wide a board you can place on your miter saw with a single plunge by the size of the compound miter saw’s blade.

Angled Cuts

The miter saw got its name from the ability to turn the saw head left and right. By doing this, you can plunge the saw’s blade into your workpiece at an angle, thus producing a mitered cut, or more often referred to as an angled cut.

Most compound miter saws have the ability to turn up to 50° in both directions. Some models can go beyond the 50°-mark, but it really depends on the size of the blade and the saw’s maximum length-cutting capacity. There are usually positive stops at the most-used angles (0°, 22.5°, 45°) to help you find the appropriate angle to lock it in place.

Almost every woodworking project will call for making angled cuts. If you’re building tables, chairs, shelves, cabinets, crown molding, etc. (the list is endless), you’ll need the ability to cut two connecting boards at 45° to produce right angles. This is where the mitering ability of the miter saw reigns supreme.

What can you cut with a 10 inch miter saw?

Bevel Cuts

The traditional miter saw only has the ability to produce an angled cut on one plane. For most woodworking projects, this will be all you need. However, there might be a time when you wish you could make a 45° crosscut while the cut-portion of the board has a 45° taper. Traditionally this would call for the use of two cuts from two separate tools: the 45° crosscut on your miter saw and then the 45° tapered cut on your table saw.

With a compound miter saw, you only need to make one single plunge to get the desired cut on two different planes. First, adjust the miter by rotating the head to the left or right and locking it at the appropriate angle. Next, tilt the saw head to the right or left (depending on your model) so it produces a tapered edge. Most compound miter saws have a beveling capacity of between 0° and 48°.

As we mentioned earlier, most of your projects won’t call for a compound cut so your tool’s beveling gauge might become a bit rusty. However, as your skills as a woodworker increase and become more willing to make pentagonal, hexagonal, or octagonal pieces of furniture or crown molding, you’ll be glad that your compound miter saw can make the tedious cuts for you in a single plunge.

What is a double bevel compound miter saw?

Repeatable Cuts

The ability to make repeated cuts across numerous boards is something that many people learn the value of very later on in their woodworking career. It’s extremely time-consuming having to adjust the angle of the saw head and readjusting it after each cut even though you’re cutting at a single predetermined angle each time.

A compound miter saw does this, not just for mitered cuts but also for beveled cuts. This reduces the painstaking task of measuring a million times over when cutting a million boards.

Even though table saws, circular saws, and many other power saws can be locked into the same position for repeated cuts, the compound miter saw is one of the very few tools that can be locked to produce cuts at two different angles simultaneously.

What about Dual and Sliding Compound Miter Saws?

This is a fair question to ask since these are regarded as the third and fourth generations of the miter saw respectively.

The only differentiating factor of a dual compound miter saw is that the saw head can bevel in both directions, whereas a regular compound miter saw can only bevel either to the left or right. It’s a time-saving feature since you don’t need to flip your board over to get the second beveled cut in place.

As for the sliding compound miter saw, the only difference is the sliding head. When making cross cuts or angled cuts, you can pull the head towards you before plunging the blade into the board. To finish the cut, after the blade has cleared material from the initial plunge, you push it back toward its original position the pull it back up. Essentially, a sliding compound miter saw has a larger crosscutting capacity compared to the other miter saw types.

What is the difference between a chop saw and a miter saw?

Final Remarks

This article sums up the main benefits of a compound miter saw. It’s essentially a time-saving tool, but many of what it can do is already covered by a regular table saw, assuming that you have an angle-cutting jig for your unit. The thing that really makes a compound miter saw shine is that it can cut at two different angles (miter and bevel) in a single pass; something that a table saw in incapable of doing, let alone a wide assortment of handheld power saws.


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Compound Miter Saw Saws

Bosch GCM12SD vs DEWALT DWS779

Today, we’re going to be looking at two distinct compound miter saws. The Bosch GCM12SD, and the DEWALT DWS779. Now, these two compound miter saws are from two well-known manufacturers. They are both quite good as well. Both of them have their own distinct qualities that we are going to discuss in this article.

Bosch GCM12SD vs DEWALT DWS779: Compound Miter Saw Comparison

Bosch GCM12SD

Before we get into that, though, let’s define what a compound miter saw is, and how it is different from a traditional miter saw.


So, What Exactly Is A Compound Miter Saw?

A compound miter saw is very similar to a regular miter saw, but with one key difference. Using a compound miter saw, you can maneuver the blade to cut at different angles. For example, when working on a board that is, say, 2 X 16, you can cut at a 45-degree angle. So, if you’re working on a project that requires some very exact cuts that are at slightly unusual angles, then a compound miter saw is a necessity.

Miter saws, on the other hand, can only cut vertically. So, cuts are always straight. Now, these cuts sure look nice, but the saw itself doesn’t give you much in the way of flexibility.

DEWALT DWS779 vs Bosch GCM12SD: Compound Miter Saw Comparison

DEWALT DWS779

The Bosch GCM12SD

Right off the bat, you’ll notice that this is a hefty little saw. Coming in at 88.2 pounds, the Bosch CCM12SD is far from being lightweight.

However, you will notice something very distinct about the saw. It has an axial glide system that is designed for compact workspaces. Now, this particular axial glide system was actually patented by Bosch, several years ago. They designed it with the intention of creating an axial glide system that had three main characteristics.

Durability. Control. And, of course, the ability to use this system in compact spaces. Fortunately, that is more than the case with the Bosch GCM12SD, which lives up to those design intentions.

Bosch GCM12SD vs DEWALT DWS779

Bosch GCM12SD

Here, you have a 14-inch horizontal cutting capacity. As well as a 6,5-inch vertical cutting capacity. For crown capacity, you also have 6,5-inches.

Due to the decent cutting capacity of this saw, you have a lot of freedom when it comes to the kinds of cuts that you want to make. That isn’t only because of the cutting capacity, though. Using the uniform bevel and miter scales, you can adjust the saw very easily.

This is a great compound miter saw. It gives you the flexibility and power that you need. Now, it may be a bit difficult to move it around, especially if you are moving from worksite to worksite. But, regardless of that, it is still an excellent purchase, if you are in the market for a compound miter saw.

DEWALT DWS779

Instead of weighing 88.2 pounds, the DEWALT DWS779 weighs a total of 67 pounds. If you’re going to be moving around to different work sites on a regular basis, this is something to take note of.

Using this saw, you can cut boards that are up to by 2 X 16 at 90-degrees. For a 2 X 12, you can cut at 45 degrees. For crown molding, you can cut up to 7,5-inches.

DEWALT DWS779 vs Bosch GCM12SD

DEWALT DWS779

Bosch GCM12SD

Bosch GCM12SD

You also have access to an oversized bevel scale. This scale makes it very easy to make any kind of bevel angle adjustment.

While you’re cutting, and when you are done cutting, the dust goes through a dust collection system. This system is very efficient and very useful. Based on metrics that DEWALT has provided, it captures over 75 percent of the dust that is generated during the sawing process.

The motor is 15 Amps and 3,800 RPM. This gives you plenty of power, even during long stages of use. It also greatly aids in the durability of the saw itself.

One of the great things about DEWALT is that all of their products come with a three-year guaranteed warranty. No extra charges or hidden costs. As you can imagine, this is also very useful when it comes to maintaining the durability and overall quality of your saw.

DEWALT DWS779

DEWALT DWS779

Final Words

Now, the DEWALT DWS779 is another great compound miter saw. It works very well. You have a lot of flexibility and freedom when it comes to using this particular saw. That, and it only weighs 67 pounds.

However, at the same time, it doesn’t offer as much power or freedom as the Bosch CSM12SD. This isn’t a huge issue unless you need to make some very specific cuts. In that case, this may not be the ideal compound miter saw.



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Compound Miter Saw Saws

DEWALT DW715 vs DWS779 Compound Miter Saws

One tool that serious hobbyist and professional carpenters need for building furniture and home repairs is a miter saw. Compound miter saws offer more flexibility in cutting at a wide range of different angles. This tool is made to cut crown moldings, picture frames, and door frames, as well as window casings. What truly puts the compound miter saw a step further than the traditional miter saw is the ability to pivot and bevel left, right, or in both directions.

DEWALT DW715 vs DEWALT DWS779

DEWALT DW715

In this article, we’re going to compare two of DEWALT’s compound miter saw models: the DeWalt DW715 and the DeWalt DWS779. They both sport 12-inch blades and 15.0-amp motors. They’re lightweight and easy to take from job site to job site. The question now is what exactly makes one model superior to the otherThat’s what we’re about to find out.

Cutting Capacity

DEWALT DW715
The cutting capacity of a miter saw refers to how large a block or board of wood can be placed on the base. Generally speaking, being able to cut larger boards is preferable, but it really depends on what you plan doing with your saw. The DW715 can cut stock with widths as large as 4 x 6 inches at 90°, and 2 x 6 inches at a 45° miter.

DEWALT DWS779 vs DEWALT DW715

DEWALT DWS779

DEWALT DWS779
This tool is a sliding miter saw. This means that it has a radial arm that moves forward and backward, increasing the cutting capacity in almost all directions. At 90°, it can cut 2 x 16-inch boards, and at 45° it has the capacity to cut boards of up to 2 x 12 inches.

Conclusion: A sliding arm gives you more versatility and cutting capacity. We feel that the sliding radial arm on the DWS779 would have more uses in the workshop for home repairs or furniture construction than the DW715 in terms of how large a board the tool can cut.


Tool Weight

DEWALT DW715
Weight doesn’t really matter if you plan on mounting a miter saw on your worktable in a static position. However, if you’re looking for a tool to take with you to various job sites, weight definitely plays a significant role in portability. The DW715 weighs about 42 pounds so there are hardly any issues with carrying, loading, and unloading this tool from the bed of a truck.

DEWALT DWS779
As for the DWS779, it weighs in at around 56 pounds which is also lightweight for a miter saw. The 20-pound difference in weight between the two tools might not be that significant to most users. However, it should be noted that the additional weight of this unit isn’t attributed to a more powerful motor but rather the sliding capability of the head.

Conclusion: If you’re looking to keep the total weight of your tools on your truck to a minimum, the DW715 would be the tool to get. Just remember that with the added weight of the DWS779 you’re getting greater cutting capacities.

DEWALT DW715

DEWALT DW715

Maximum Speed

DEWALT DW715
When it comes to miter saws, higher blade-spinning speeds translate to quicker, cleaner cuts. The DW715 is rated 4,000 RPM no-load speed which is about the average speed you can from the assortment of 15.0-amp, 12-inch compound miter saws.

DEWALT DWS779
The DWS779, despite having the same motor power and blade size as the DW715, has a maximum no-load speed of 3,800 RPM. This is around the industry average for miter saws with comparable settings and still produces good, clean cuts.

Conclusion: The 200-RPM disparity between these two models is immaterial. You’ll find more significant differences in speed between models with different sized blades and different motor power. As for these two tools, one doesn’t really have any notable superiority over the other in terms of blade speed.

DEWALT DWS779

DEWALT DWS779

Miter and Bevel Range

DEWALT DW715
The miter-range of a miter saw indicates how far the head can turn to produce angled cross-cuts. The bevel refers to how far the head can twist, increasing flexibility and reducing the need to cross-cut boards standing vertically. The DW715 can miter up to 50° in both directions and bevels 48° to the left and 3° to the right. There are several positive stops at commonly used miter and bevel angles.

DEWALT DWS779
The DWS779 can miter up to 50° to the left and 60° to the right. The head bevels 45° to the left and right, as well. There are 10 positive stops you can use to help find the correct angle. Many other miter saw models on the market also have these features.

Conclusion: There’s really nothing too magnificent here in terms of mitering and beveling capacities. You should also note that despite the DW715’s inability to bevel and miter as far as the DWS779, this problem is easily overcome by simply flipping your board over and cutting at the right angle from there.

Electric Brakes

DEWALT DW715
When working with high-speed blades, safety should always be your first priority. The DW715 is equipped with the basics – dust bag and retracting blade guard – but it doesn’t have electric brakes.

DEWALT DWS779
Electric brakes are a system that stops the high-speed blade from spinning in a short amount of time without destroying the arbor hole, blade, or head in any way. It’s an added safety measure to prevent the blade from spinning when the head is lifted and the blade guard returns to its retracted position. The brakes can make the blade stop entirely in two seconds flat.

Conclusion: Obviously, having electric brakes is better than not having them. However, we have to note that the blade guards in both of these models are rather durable and installed well so there should be a reduced risk of the guard failing to retract for any reason. That being said, we like the extra insurance that the DWS779 provides.

DEWALT DW715 vs DEWALT DWS779: Compound Miter Saw Comparison

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DEWALT DW715 vs DWS779: Verdict

Both of these tools perform great, have powerful motors, and are reliable. The bad thing is that neither of them has that “wow” factor that truly sets them apart from the flood of miter saw models available today, but at least they come with the adequate safety features (blade guards and .

Between the DeWalt DW715 and the DeWalt DWS779, we feel that you would get much more value out of the latter than the former mainly due to the sliding capability of the arm. However, if you’re working on small projects like making picture frames, a sliding arm shouldn’t be what you need, and the DW715 would be the more cost-effective option, though it doesn’t have the capacity to be your go-to miter saw when you grow and develop a taste for working on larger projects.

DEWALT DWS779 vs DEWALT DW715: Compound Miter Saw Comparison

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Categories
Compound Miter Saw Saws

Hitachi C10FCG vs C10FCH2 Compound Miter Saws

One handy, dandy tool that every serious hobbyist and professional carpenter need for their line of work is a miter saw. The most versatile type of miter saw is the bevel compound miter saw which not only miters to the left and right, but the head can swivel in one or both directions. This means you no longer have to hold a piece of material vertically against the fence, but instead, you just need to tilt the saw head to the appropriate angle and plunge it down and into the material.

Hitachi C10FCG vs C10FCH2

Hitachi C10FCG

We’re going to take a close look at two of Hitachi’s most high-rated bevel compound miter saw models: the Hitachi C10FCG and the Hitachi C10FCH2. From their model codes, it’s safe to assume that they come from the same product series, but the latter has more bells and whistles that make it easier to use. The only question left to answer is how much better is the C10FCH2 compared to the C10FCGLet’s find out.

Maximum Speed

C10FCG and C10FCH2
Miter saws rely heavily on high speed to produce clean cuts with every plunge. Both the C10FCG and the C10FCH2 come equipped with 15.0-amp motors that produce up to 5,000 RPM no-load. This is rather impressive considering that these are budget-friendly miter saws, though the size of the blade plays a role in its super-quick spin.

Hitachi C10FCH2 vs C10FCG

Hitachi C10FCH2

Blade Size

C10FCG and C10FCH2
Speaking of blade size, both of these tools use 10-inch 24-tooth blades. Miter saws usually come with blades ranging between 7-1/4 and 12-inches. The best things about 10-inch blades are that they are extremely quick and are readily available in many hardware stores and online if you need to purchase replacements. The drawback of 10 inchers is that they have limited cutting capacities, but hobbyists and even professional woodworkers can make use out of 10-inch miter saw blades for a wide range of project.


Cutting Capacity

C10FCG and C10FCH2
We mentioned earlier that the cutting capacities of 10-inch blades are rather limited. In numerical terms, when the head is at the upright position, it can produce cuts of up to 2-5/16 x -21/32 inches. When mitered at a 52° angle in any direction, it can cut up to 2-5/16 x 3-1/2 inches. When the head is beveled at 45°, it has a cutting capacity of up to 1-5/8 x 4 inches. The simple way to overcome the limited cutting capacity of the 10-inch C10FCG and C10FCH2 is by flipping your material over and finishing the cut from the other side. Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

Hitachi C10FCG

Hitachi C10FCG

Beveling and Mitering Capacities

C10FCG and C10FCH2
Beveling refers to how the head of the miter saw and tilt sideways, whereas mitering is the ability of the saw head to swing in both directions. How far the bevel or miter of the saw head determines at what angles the blade can cut through materials.

Both the C10FCG and C10FCH2 have the same beveling and mitering ranges. It can bevel up to 45° to the left and miter up to 52° to the left and right. They also have positive stops placed at 0°, 15°, 22.5°, 31.6°, and 45° – the most commonly used angles when construction furniture or fixtures.

Hitachi C10FCH2

Hitachi C10FCH2

Portability

C10FCG
Many contract workers need to have their own set of tools ready to take with them to various job sites. Because of this, it’s important to select tools that are easy to load and unload onto and from the bed of your truck. The C10FCG weighs only 26.2 pounds, making it extremely lightweight.

C10FCH2
The C10FCH2 is only very slightly heavier than the C10FCG. It weighs 26.5 pounds. The difference in weight is due to the laser guide that comes with the tool (more on this later).

Conclusion: The difference in weight is so immaterial that they’re practically the same weight. That being said, these bevel compound miter saws are so lightweight that lifting them using a single hand is possible and entirely easy to do. One downside of such a lightweight miter saw is that it needs to be mounted to avoid accidents. In fact, any miter saw – heavy or light – should be mounted on a work surface correctly to avoid the worst-case scenarios.

Laser Guide

C10FCG
Laser guides are great for helping ensure proper cuts with every plunge, but experienced woodworkers and even novice ones can learn where the blade enters in a piece of wood through trial and error. The C10FCG doesn’t have a laser guide, but you’ll learn “how to” without one.

Hitachi C10FCG vs C10FCH2: Bevel Compound Miter Saw Comparison

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C10FCH2
The main differentiator between the C10FCG and the C10FCH2 is that the latter comes with a laser guide. The light’s not tremendously bright so you’ll probably end up learning to use this miter saw without relying on the light too much. In closed spaces, the laser guide should be completely visible.

Conclusion: The additional 0.3 pounds of the C10FCH2 compared to the C10FCG is mainly due to the laser guide. The laser guide itself shines brightly in closed areas, but when working outdoors, you’ll have to rely on careful measurements and pure intuition to get the right cuts with every plunge. That being said, any craftsman worth his or her salt should know how to use a miter saw without a laser guide but having one built-in to your miter saw can really help speed things up.

Dust Collection System

C10FCG and C10FCH2
One thing that many customers have complained about is the somewhat poor-quality dust collection bag that comes with these models. The bag attaches to the dust port behind the machine and is supposed to prevent dust and chips from going airborne.

What we found is that the bag collects roughly 40% to 50% of the chips produced from the blade. The one, true way to properly collect dust with these miter saws is by connecting your shop vac to the dust port, but you’ll need to attach an adapter to so your shop vac’s hose can connect properly (adapter sold separately).

Hitachi C10FCH2 vs C10FCG: Bevel Compound Miter Saw Comparison

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Verdict

One thing we should mention is that both the Hitachi C10FCG and C10FCH2 are budget-friendly bevel compound miter saws, so comparing these tools to heavy-duty, costly miter saws from other brands isn’t really fair. That being said, we feel that as budget-friendly alternatives, these tools do what you’d expect from a miter saw with its blade size, motor, and beveling and mitering capacities.

These miter saws aren’t exactly things you would brag to other contract workers about, but they can get most home and contract woodworking jobs done. If we had to recommend one over the other, we’d say spend the extra bucks and get the Hitachi C10FCH2 with a built-in laser guide. The guide may not be the brightest beam of light, but when visible it’s extremely helpful in ensuring accurate cuts with every plunge of the blade.



Categories
Compound Miter Saw Saws

Evolution Power Tools RAGE2 vs RAGE3 vs RAGE4

Chop saws are all the rage when you need to cut straight through metal pipes, angle beams, and nails. They work similarly to a miter saw, but most models lack the ability to bevel the saw head to make angled cuts through wood and metal. This is easily overcome by flipping the piece of metal over or clamping it down at an angle to give you the appropriate position for cutting. With a chop saw in your shop, you can say goodbye to the traditional hacksaw which takes way more effort to produce clean cuts in hard materials.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE2 vs RAGE3 vs RAGE4

Evolution Power Tools RAGE2

In this article, we’re going to take a look at three of Evolution Power Tools’ chop saws: the RAGE2, RAGE3, and RAGE4. The company is a master at making steel-cutting tools, and their expertise is clear from their high-quality chop saws. These three chop saw models might have similar functions, but their design and range cutting capacities are worlds apart. Let’s see which of these models would fit best in your arsenal of woodworking and metalworking tools.

Design

RAGE2 and RAGE4
The RAGE2 and RAGE4 have the more traditional look to a chop saw. Although they have the ability to miter to produce angled cross-cuts, operating the tool is done by mainly dropping the head downwards and retracting it when it’s made a clean pass through the material. There aren’t very many bells and whistles that come with these models.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3 vs RAGE4 vs RAGE2

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3

RAGE3
As for the RAGE3, this is basically a compound miter saw with a 28-tooth TCT blade. The miter-saw-design makes it bulkier and heavier, but if you’re used to operating a miter saw then this tool will be super-easy to use.

Conclusion: A simple alternative to a chop saw is installing a TCT blade in your miter saw at home. If you don’t have a miter saw, we recommend getting the RAGE3 since you can just swap out the TCT blade with a high-speed steel one for cutting exclusively through the wood. However, miter saws, even with a TCT blade or other metal-cutting blade, has very limited use on metal since they operate at much quicker speeds. For this reason, if you deal with metal on a regular basis, you’ll need a dedicated metal-chopping tool like the RAGE2 or RAGE4.


Maximum Speed

RAGE2
The RAGE2 has a speed rating of up to 1,450 RPM. This may seem low but keep in mind that metal-cutting tools should produce slower RPMs in order to cut through thicker materials. Because this tool is designed for thicker pieces of metal, you should feed the blade into the material at a slower rate.

RAGE3
The miter-saw-lookalike – the RAGE3 – has an RPM-rating of 2,500. This tool is the middle ground between the RAGE2 and RAGE4 in terms of how thick the materials this tool can slice through.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE4 vs RAGE2 vs RAGE3

Evolution Power Tools RAGE4

RAGE4
The RAGE4, the fastest blade, has a speed rating of up to 3,500 RPM no-load. The high-speed blade makes this tool more appropriate for cutting through low schedule pipes, thin angled beams, etc.

Conclusion: RPM plays a huge role in a chop saw’s ability to cut through all sorts of dense materials, including metals like steel, copper, bronze, etc. The thicker the material, the slower the blade should spin in order to cut cleanly through the material without producing sparks. If you deal with thinner pieces of metal, then the RAGE4 would be the best option here to get work done quickly. When dealing with larger, thicker pieces of material, the RAGE2 should suit you fine.

Blade Size

RAGE2
The size of the blade determines how thick/wide a piece of metal or wood can be cut by the chop saw. Larger blades have greater cutting capacities but are often slower than machines with smaller blades. The RAGE2 uses a super-large 14-inch blade, thus the slower RPM.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE2 vs RAGE3 vs RAGE4: Saw Comparison

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RAGE3
The RAGE3 comes with a 10-inch blade which is about the second largest size blade you can get for a miter saw. There are several types of blades out there for you to choose from in case you want to replace TCT blade that comes with the tool. Because of the commonly used blade size, you can install blades from different manufacturers in this saw.

RAGE4
This model comes with a small 7-1/4-inch TCT blade for multi-purpose cutting applications. The small blade means shallower cuts in a piece of metal or flipping the metal over to complete the cut. Small blades aren’t necessarily bad, but in general, they require more passes to finish a cut than a large 10- or 14-inch blade.

Conclusion: It goes without saying that the size of the blade can be an indicator of the cutting capacity of a chop saw. The larger the blade, the more material it can cut in a single pass. However, you must decide how big a blade you need. That being said, going big, in the case of chop saws, is better since it allows you to increase your workload as you become more accustomed to using the tool.

Mitering Capacity
RAGE2 and RAGE4
Unlike miter saws, the heads of these two chop saw models don’t swivel, but instead on the base is a swivel clamp which holds your material in place and can swivel to the left, up to 45°, to make angled cuts. The clamp system works rather nice, and it’s easy to set up and use. Just be sure that everything is tightened as much as possible to prevent kickback.

RAGE3
Unsurprisingly, this miter saw can cut angled cuts up to 45° to the left and right after swiveling the head. There are nine positive stops to help ensure that you’re cutting at the appropriate angle.

Conclusion: Being able to swivel the head or position the material at an angle helps in completing specific jobs. Between the swiveling head of the RAGE3 and the clamp system of both the RAGE2 and RAGE4, we prefer the RAGE3’s mitering ability. The clamping system is great, too, but it requires tedious measuring to get the appropriate angle, whereas the RAGE3’s positive stops along the 0° to 45° make for quick setup.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3 vs RAGE4 vs RAGE2

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Evolution Power Tools: Verdict

It’s clear that these three tools, though work similarly, have very different functions. The RAGE2, with its low RPM and large blade, is designed to slice through thick pieces of metal, plastic, or wood in a single pass. The RAGE3 is a miter saw that does what you’d want from a miter saw to do, but the addition of a TCT blade makes it extra versatile for cutting metal bars, pipes, and nails.

The RAGE4 is perhaps the entry-level chop saw designed for slicing through small pieces of metal, evidenced by its high RPM and 7-1/4-inch blade. We feel that the middle path – the RAGE3 – is the most flexible tool here, though if you have one in your shop and just need a metal-cutting chop saw to add to your collection, then we recommend getting the Evolution Power Tools RAGE2.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE4 vs RAGE2 vs RAGE3: Saw Comparison

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Categories
Compound Miter Saw Saws

DEWALT DW872 vs Evolution Power Tools RAGE3

There are several types of power saws that you should have in your workshop. Woodworkers would appreciate the classic miter saw – sliding-compound or otherwise – to get the job done. However, if your line of work calls for cutting both wood and metal bars to size, then you’ll need a more multipurpose saw. A multi-cutter saw is a tool that every wood and metalworker needs to get the job done without investing in multiple tools.

DEWALT DW872 vs Evolution Power Tools RAGE3

DEWALT DW872

In this article, we’re going to take a look at two very different multi-cutter saw models from two popular power tool manufacturers: the DW872 from DEWALT and the RAGE3 from Evolution Power Tools. In a nutshell, the DEWALT packs more power and has a larger cutting capacity, but the EPT is more versatile and designed more as the classic miter saw. Between these two, which of these models would work best for you in the workshopLet’s find out.


Blade Size

DEWALT DW872
Like the traditional miter saw, a larger blade translates into the ability to chop larger stock with a single plunge. It’s always safer to complete a cut with a single pass than having to turn the wood stock or metal bar over, so a larger blade is always preferable. The DEWALT comes with a large 14-inch carbide blade that can cut as deep as 5-3/16 inches. This should be more than enough for most DIY projects and even professional jobs.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3 vs DEWALT DW872: Multi-Cutter Saw Comparison

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3

EPT RAGE3
The carbide blade that comes with the EPT is slightly smaller than the DEWALT’s. It comes with a 10-inch, 28-tooth blade that can cut to depths of 3 inches with each plunge. Due to the smaller size, this tool would be more appropriate for DIY-ers whose projects revolve around slicing wood and metal (ferrous and non-ferrous) to size.

Conclusion: Only the user can determine whether a large 14-inch blade is more appropriate for their line of work than a 10-inch one. The shallower cutting depth of the EPT can be overcome by flipping the material over to complete the cut, but we highly recommend getting a saw that can complete a cut with a single pass.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE2 vs RAGE3 vs RAGE4: Saw Comparison

Weight and Portability

DEWALT DW872
Lightweight power tools are best for contract workers who need to bring their equipment to the job site. The DEWALT, fully assembled, weighs in at around 55 pounds, so it’s easy to carry and lift onto your truck. Unloading it and locking it down is also a breeze if you have the muscle.

EPT RAGE3
The EPT’s smaller blade significantly reduces the weight of the multi-cutter saw. With the blade attached, the EPT weighs roughly 39 pounds, making it one of the lightest 10-inch miter saws available.

DEWALT DW872

DEWALT DW872

Conclusion: Although the EPT is lighter, we can’t forget that it has a shallow cutting capacity. The DEWALT can cut 5-3/16 inches deep, but it weighs 16 pounds more than the EPT. In the end, we feel that even though the DEWALT is heavier, it packs a greater punch. Honestly speaking, lifting a 55-pound saw isn’t going to tear your back and shoulder muscles.

Mitering

DEWALT DW872
Like a miter saw, a multi-cutter saw should have the ability to make angled cuts by swinging the head or rotating the position of the stock. With the DEWALT, you can make angled cuts by clamping on the wood or metal piece and positioning it at 15°, 30°, or 45°. Precision when cutting at other angles is not guaranteed.

EPT RAGE3
The EPT has a mitering range of up to 45° to the left and right. There are nine positive stops between 0° and 45° to both sides to help with making a wide range of different angled cuts. A clamp keeps the stock in place while the head plunges downward at one of the nine different angles.

Conclusion: The most common angles for mitered cuts are 0°, 22.5°, and 30°, and 45°. The DEWALT’s setup gives you the options to cut at three of these four angles, whereas the EPT provides positive stops for all of them – both to the left and right. Even though you can freehand a 22.5° cut on the DEWALT, it’s not entirely safe, and there’s no way to guarantee precise, repeatable cuts.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3

DEWALT DW872 vs Evolution Power Tools RAGE4: Multi-Cutter Saw Comparison

Beveling

DEWALT DW872
Miter saws also come with the ability to bevel the head at angles other than 90° to help produce compound cuts. The DEWALT does not have the ability to tilt the head left or right so making compound miter plus beveled cuts is impossible.

EPT RAGE3
It’s an entirely different story with the EPT. Apart from being able to miter the head 45° to the left and right, the head can also bevel 45°, albeit only to the left. This should help you with crown molding, picture frames, and joining.

Conclusion: The DEWALT is a simple tool with hardly any bells and whistles, so it’s understandable that it doesn’t come with the ability to bevel the head in any direction. However, compared to the EPT with its mitering, beveling, AND sliding abilities (more on the sliding head later), it’s easy to see that you have more flexibility with the EPT than the DEWALT.

Sliding Head

DEWALT DW82
The main benefit of having a sliding head on a miter saw is that you can increase the length of the cut. Instead of plunging the head downwards into the stock, you can pull the head toward yourself before plunging pushing it back to its starting position. The DEWALT – a simple tool with hardly anything on it – doesn’t come with a sliding head.

DEWALT DW872 vs Evolution Power Tools RAGE3: Multi-Cutter Saw Comparison

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EPT RAGE3
The same can’t be said about the EPT. The sliding head on the RAGE3 increases its cutting capacity to slice through boards as wide as 11-13/16 inches. The maximum cutting capacity of the EPT (90° bevel, 0° miter) is 3 x 11-13/16 inches. For a multi-cutter saw, this is mighty impressive.

Conclusion: The EPT wins by default. The lack of movement with the DEWALT really sets it back when compared to the range of movement you get with the EPT. Of course, you can overcome such issues by rotating your stock and repeatedly loosening and tightening the safety clamp before plunging the head into the material, but it’s a hassle.

Best Metal Cutting Saw: Buying Guide

DEWALT vs Evolution Power Tools: Verdict

We’ve compared the DEWALT DW872, and the RAGE4 from EPT and the DEWALT came out on top. However, when faced head-to-head with the RAGE3, we can see that the strong points of the DEWALT – e.g. 14-inch blade and lightweight – really don’t shine against the flexibility and impressive cutting capacity of the EPT.

Even though making deeper cuts per plunge is an important factor, it’s not a perfect substitute for the wide range of angled cuts you can produce on the EPT RAGE3. In conclusion, DEWALT is best for those who need a tool exclusively for cutting metal at very specific angles, but if you’re in need of a multi-cutter saw for use on both wood and metal, the Evolution Power Tools RAGE3 is definitely the way to go.

Evolution Power Tools RAGE3 vs DEWALT DW872: Multi-Cutter Saw Comparison

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Best Compound Miter Saws: Buying Guide