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A-Check Rotary Tools

Best Rotary Tool for Wood/Stone/Metal Carving

Rotary tools are extremely versatile hand-held power tools that let you perform a number of different tasks. They’re mostly used for making intricate cuts in all sorts of materials, so if you’d like to give your art that “wow” factor, then you should definitely consider getting a rotary tool.

However, even though rotary tools can be used for all sorts of jobs, they’re not all built the same. Some excel at engraving wood and stone while others are better suited for carving metal. So join us as we dive into the world of rotary tools and learn about the different features that make them suited for certain tasks. But before we go too far, let’s talk about the basics.

What is a Rotary Tool?

Rotary tools are compact tools that use a variety of attachments to perform a wide range of different jobs. Even though rotary tools are mainly used to grind way thin layers of metal, they’re also handy and engraving, buffing, sanding, and much, much more.

Even though the type of work you can do with a rotary tool is dependent on the type of attachments mounted to the tool, the real magic sauce behind its versatility is its high-speed motor. The maximum speed of the tool varies from model to model, but it’s not uncommon to find rotary tools that can go beyond 30,000 RPM. Admittedly, the diameter of the tool is quite small and thus easy to reach high speeds.


Corded vs. Cordless Rotary Tools

Unlike so many other power tools, the decision to choose corded or cordless rotary tools isn’t all that difficult. Since the tool is naturally lightweight and compact, the only thing you need to consider is whether you can live being tied down by a power cord or not.

The obvious benefit of corded tools is that the only limitation of the runtime is the heat produced by the motor. As long as the motor is cool to the touch, you’re free to grind away to your heart’s desire. Of course, your range of movement is limited by the power cord, but an easy solution would be to use an extension cord.

As for cordless rotary tools, you get to use the tool wherever you are on the planet as long as the battery still has some juice. This comes in handy when doing extremely intricate engraving in where the power cord might obstruct your view or simply be too short to allow maximum freedom of movement. You’re also limited to the amount of work you can do per charge, but modern cordless rotary tools come with beefy batteries that last for more than 30 minutes of continuous usage.

Rotary Tool Buying Guide

In this section, we’ll talk about the various specs and features that you should be on the lookout for when shopping for a rotary tool. However, it’s crucial that you know what materials you’re going to work with since certain rotary tools are best used for certain projects. To assist you in finding the appropriate model, we’ll divide this section into three parts based on the materials you’re engraving. The three sections are rotary tools for wood, rotary tools for stone, and rotary tools for metal.

Rotary Tool for Wood Engraving Buying Guide

When choosing the right rotary tool for engraving wood, there are certain features and specs you need to be aware of. This guide will describe what things make for a good rotary tool for wood carving.

Motor Power

The size of the motor determines how well the rotary tool will cut through your workpiece. For obvious reasons, a stronger motor is ideal since it’ll allow you to carve any material, including wood. The minimum motor rating we’d recommend for wood engraving would be 1 amp, though it’s not going to be too difficult to find a much powerful motor than that.

High Speed

Carving through wood is a bit different from carving through other materials. A higher speed is actually ideal since it has a lesser likelihood of leaving unsightly burn marks. All rotary tools are built to deliver thousands and even tens of thousands of rotational spin per minute, so speed is also not too much of an issue.

However, a truly versatile rotary tool should have a variable speed dial or pre-settings. Some models let you change the speed of the bit on the fly while others require you shut it off when switching between gears. The mechanism used to change speeds is up to you based on personal preference; what’s important is that it can deliver between 5,000 RPM and upwards of 30,000 RPM.

Bit Material

The two most commonly used materials to make rotary engraving bits are carbide tungsten and high-speed steel. Carbide bits are considerably more expensive but last longer and do not dull as easily. HSS bits are cheaper and dull much more easily than carbide, but if you don’t use your rotary tool regularly, then HSS bits can actually be more cost-effective.

Bit Diameter

The size of the bit indicates how much material it’ll remove per rotation. The diameter of a bit can be as tiny as ¼ of an inch to as large as ¾. Larger bits remove more material but also do not offer the same control as smaller bits for producing more precise, intricate details.

Cylindrical Bit and Pointed Bits

For engraving in wood, the two most suitable types of bits are cylindrical bits and pointed bits.

Cylindrical bits have more surface area than pointed bits, making them more adequate at removing a ton of material per sweep. This comes in handy when you need to dig deep into the wood before etching finer details with a pointed bit.

Pointed bits are used to etch intricate details in wood. With a steady hand and a keen eye, you can produce beautiful trim and carvings on your wood-based art.

Rotary Tool for Stone Engraving Buying Guide

Seeing as how the stone is considerably denser than even the toughest wood, the right rotary tool for the job will need to be significantly more powerful. In this section, we’ll go over the various specs of a stone engraving rotary tool and the appropriate bits.

Variable Speed Dial

A multi-speed or rotary tool is infinitely better than a single-speed model since it lets you carve all sorts of materials, provided you use the right bit. For engraving stone and concrete, we’d recommend getting a rotary tool with a speed dial rather than preset gears. The minimum speed you’d need would be roughly 4,000 RPM, and the maximum speed can be as high as you’d like.

Motor Power

Concrete is much tougher than wood. Therefore, in order for a rotary tool to engrave effectively in stone, it needs a more powerful motor. We recommend finding a tool that comes with a motor that’s at least 2 amps, but a higher amperage rating would be ideal.

Cordless

Since most stone carving is going to be done outdoors, we recommend that you look for a high-quality cordless rotary tool. You can make do with a corded model and an outdoor-safe extension cord, but to truly eliminate any hassle, cordless is the way to go. Keep in mind that cordless 2-plus-amp rotary tools may be a bit difficult to come by.

Diamond-Tipped Bits

In order to engrave concrete effectively, you need to mount diamond-tipped bits into the rotary tool’s chuck. Diamond-tipped bits offer enough strength and durability in engraving hard materials like concrete and stone without dulling the bit. These do have a high investment cost, but they’re much more effective than regular carbide. Plus, they won’t dull nearly as quickly when used for grinding stone.

Flex Shaft Attachment

Even though a flex shaft attachment would be useful in any situation, it’s extremely handy when engraving stone. The odd shape of stone would make even the thinnest, most compact rotary tool a bit of a hassle to maneuver. The flex shaft allows you to really get the diamond-tipped bit in the tiniest crevices without having to hold the rotary tool’s body at an awkward angle.

All-Size Chuck

Bits for carving stone come in all sizes. For this reason, we highly recommend finding a model that comes with an all-size chuck, or a chuck that can mount up to ¾-inch bits. You may also want to consider the bits themselves since, like wood-carving bits, larger bits remove more material but aren’t as precise as smaller, pointed bits.

Rotary Tool for Metal Engraving Buying Guide

Engraving metal with a rotary tool is more similar to engraving wood than stone. This section will discuss the various things you look out for when searching for a rotary tool to cut/grind/sand/engrave metal.

Motor Power

It’s extremely important that the rotary tool comes with a sufficiently powerful motor in order to engrave or cut through metal. However, the strength of the motor ultimately depends on what sort of metal you’re working with.

If your project calls for engraving soft aluminum or pewter, a smallish 2-amp motor would be adequate. Harder metals like stainless steel would require something beefier – around 5 amps – in order to make clean cuts and grooves.

You’ll also need to consider the thickness of your material. Thicker pieces like pipes or conduits would require a stronger motor to cut through. As for thin sheets or bars, a 2- or 3-amp motor would suffice.

Battery Voltage

Even though corded tools are almost always more powerful than cordless, both corded and cordless rotary tools produce enough power to engrave, cut, and grind metal.

If you decide to get a cordless rotary tool for its supreme portability and maneuverability, take a look at the size of the battery. The battery doesn’t necessarily indicate motor power, but it does play a role in how long the tool will run. Metal, which is denser than wood, will deplete the battery quicker, so to work comfortably without having to swap batteries or wait for them to fully charge, consider getting a cordless rotary tool that uses a 20V battery.

Variable Speed Dial

Engraving, cutting, and grinding metal are three jobs that have different speed requirements to do effectively without producing sharp edges. Engraving and grinding metal need to be done at high speed – more than 10,000 RPM – whereas cutting metal should be done at a lower speed of around 3,000 to 5,000 RPM. Once again, we recommend finding a model that has a variable speed dial that lets you choose how much speed to deliver. Preset speeds might be either too slow or too fast for engraving and cutting jobs.

Chuck

The bits used to engrave metal can be anywhere from ¼ of an inch to ¾ of an inch in diameter. It’s a good idea to get the largest chuck available that can clamp onto bits of all sizes, especially if you plan on using your rotary tool for creating intricate designs as well as grinding away rust.

Final Remarks

Rotary tools are handheld power tools that have a million and one different uses. They’re mainly used to grind away rust, remove fine layers off your workpieces, and cut through metal and stone. However, if you’d like to up your woodworking/metalworking/stone-engraving game, then a rotary tool can help you. Using a carving or engraving bit, you can add super-fine details to your work with ease.

There are both corded and cordless rotary tools to choose from, and each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks. If your work keeps you outdoors and away from power outlets, a cordless rotary tool can be your best friend, especially if it comes with a large battery that supplies 20 to 30 minutes of continuous runtime. A cordless rotary tool can also come in handy when working in tight, cramped spaces – e.g. under your car or in corners – without the fuss of tangled power cords and extension cords.

If you’ve read our article from start to finish, you should find that the “right” rotary tool depends on what sort of material you plan on working with. In this article, we’ve discussed how rotary tools differ based on whether they’re designed for wood, stone, or metal.

However, you could get the most out of your rotary tool by getting a powerful, high-speed tool and swap out attachments based on your needs. It’s extremely important that you have the right bit for the job since not every bit is made with the same material (carbide, high-speed steel, diamond-tipped) work the same on different materials.



Categories
Rotary Tools

Dremel 7300-N/8 vs. WEN 2305 Rotary Tool Kit

A rotary tool is a versatile, handheld power tool that can be of use in both small and major renovation projects. Having one of these around gives you the ability to sand, polish, engrave, and grind by swapping out different attachments. The small tip and compact size of a rotary tool make it a must-have piece of equipment that you will thoroughly enjoy using.

Dremel 7300-N/8 vs. WEN 2305 Rotary Tool Kit

Dremel

Dremel is arguably most famous for their high-quality, durable rotary tools, whereas WEN is a fairly new competitor in the power tools industry but has already garnered a healthy gathering of loyal followers for their unreal cost efficiency. In this article, we’d like to rotary tools coming from two polar opposite companies – the 7300-N/8 from Dremel and the 2305 from WEN. Which will be victorious in the battle of rotary toolsLet’s find out.


Motor Power

Dremel 7300-N/8
Even though rotary tools aren’t power-hungry machines, the size of the motor is still a crucial factor to consider. Stronger motors deliver more power for engraving, cutting, and sanding tougher materials. The Dremel comes with a moderate 1.2-amp tool which is on the lower end of the rotary tool motor spectrum.

WEN 2305 vs. Dremel 7300-N/8 Rotary Tool Kit

WEN

WEN 2305
As for the WEN, it comes with a smaller 1-amp motor. This size isn’t necessarily weak and shouldn’t be treated that way, but it does have limited uses and effectiveness on harder materials compared to beefier 2- or 3-amp tools.

Conclusion: Honestly, you won’t even notice a difference in power between the Dremel and WEN. The 0.2-amp disparity isn’t significant enough to gauge what the Dremel can that the WEN can’t. Therefore, we’re going to call it a draw, though technically, the Dremel SHOULD be more effective at cutting and carving.

Variable Speed

Dremel 7300-N/8
Depending on what you’re doing, you’ll either want to crank the rotary tool’s speed to the max or keep it slow and steady. The Dremel has a 2-speed motor that delivers either 6,500 RPM or 13,000 RPM. At these speeds, you can cut and buff without worrying about penetrating too deep into your work.

WEN 2305
The WEN starts at 8,000 RPM and can be cranked up all the way to 30,000 RPM and can be adjusted on the fly. There are no preset speeds, so the tool can spin at any RPM between the min and max speeds, though there’s no way to determine how quickly the bit is spinning realistically. Furthermore, when working at 30,000 RPM, the tool vibrates so violently that you’ll never need it.

Conclusion: Deciding on whether you like two preset speeds or maximum speed flexibility is the dealer’s choice. The low- and high-speed gears on the Dremel can be used in a ton of different projects, just as the WEN’s infinite speed setting.

Cordless vs. Corded

Dremel 7300-N/8
Ah, the classic debate of whether corded or cordless is the better option. The Dremel is a cordless rotary tool that runs off 4.8-volt rechargeable batteries. It offers maximum portability for working in tight corners and cramped spaces without tying you down. Real handy if you need to do some touch-up work in remote areas.

WEN 2305
The WEN is a corded-electric rotary tool with a 6-foot power cord. As a corded tool, you won’t be able to use it out in the wilderness, but wherever there’s an outlet and running electricity, this tool will run forever or until the motor burns out.

Dremel 7300-N/8 MiniMite 4.8-Volt Cordless Two-Speed Rotary Tool

Dremel

Conclusion: This is another area where the purchaser needs to decide which would benefit him or her more. Cordless tools have become more popular as of late, mainly since you don’t have to juggle power cords or extension cords to get the tool running. However, with corded-electric tools, downtime is not a factor, provided that you have the appropriate replacement accessories and running electricity.

Included Accessories

Dremel 7300-N/8
Nobody likes purchasing a toolkit that doesn’t come with all the accessories to get started right away. In this Dremel rotary tool kit, apart from the rotary tool, you also get a charger, a 4.8-volt rechargeable battery, a wrench, and eight accessories.

WEN 2305
If you thought eight accessories is a lot, then you ain’t seen nothing yet. The WEN kit comes with 100 accessories plus a handy flex shaft so you can get to grinding, sanding, cutting, and more. Granted, most of these accessories are just multiples of the same, but still… 100!

Conclusion: Whichever kit you get, just know that you can get straight to business with their numerous accessories. However, rotary attachments to require frequent replacing, especially if you use the tool regularly, but having an extra 100 attachments on hand means not having to worry about purchasing replacements for a long, long time.

WEN 2305 Rotary Tool Kit with Flex Shaft

WEN

Carrying Case

Dremel 7300-N/8
With the included charger, battery, and accessories, you’ll need a case of some sort to store the kit. Unfortunately, you’ll have to search for a case elsewhere if you get this Dremel rotary tool. The kit comes in a cardboard box.

WEN 2305
Unlike Dremel, WEN sells this rotary tool with a flex shaft in a sturdy plastic carrying case. Of course, it comes in a case. With 100 attachments and a flex shaft, they’d be bouncing around in a cardboard box, scratching up the rotary tool.

Conclusion: A carrying case is always preferable to a cardboard box, especially if you need to take the tool with you to various job sites. Of course, you could put the Dremel and all of its accessories in a bag or purchase a carrying case…

WEN 2305 Review

Verdict

Performance-wise, there really isn’t any significant difference between the 1.2-amp Dremel and the 1-amp WEN. For this reason, in determining which of the two is the better deal, we’ll have to look at the supporting factors discussed earlier.

Seeing the WEN 2305 kit and its numerous accessories, we feel that this is the more cost-efficient option, which is not a surprise seeing as how cost efficiency is WEN’s whole business plan. However, don’t mistake cheap for low-quality as this tool can do everything the Dremel 7300-N/8 does. Plus, the included flex shaft makes cutting in cramped spaces a breeze.

Dremel 7300-N/8 Review



Categories
Angle grinder Rotary Tools

What Can you do With an Angle Grinder?

An angle grinder is a highly powerful and versatile handheld power tool. It typically comes with a diamond-tipped blade which gives it the capability to slice through rough materials with very little work. However, that’s not all it does; from cutting hard materials to polishing surfaces, an angle grinder is a tool that pros and even DIY hobbyists can make use out of.

What Can you do With an Angle Grinder?

The performance of an angle grinder relies heavily on one’s ability to keep a steady hand. There aren’t any fences or clamps that come with an angle grinder so if you’re not exactly known for your dexterity, perhaps consider purchasing other cutting tools for your projects. However, this means purchasing multiple tools to cover what a single angle grinder can do.

Angle grinders were once a tool used by only the most skilled metalworkers for dimensioning workpieces and removing excess material. Today, however, we can find numerous manufacturers releasing models almost every year and increasingly affordable prices. If you’re planning on becoming a metalworker for fun, one of the most valuable tools to own would have to be an angle grinder.


Main Uses of an Angle Grinder

If you’re still a bit confused about what you can do with an angle grinder, take a look at the following list. We’ll describe the most common uses of an angle grinder that you do with the right wheels and attachments.

Cutting and Grinding

The most basic function of an angle grinder is grinding and cutting. It doesn’t just grind metal; with the right type of wheel, you can grind stone, ceramic, and even concrete.

An angle grinder can come in handy in a number of different situations – at construction sites where dried concrete is covering floors or walls or at your home workshop for cutting down metal conduits. There are even some stone sculptures who use angle grinders for adding fine details to their masterpieces.

Angle Grinder Guide

Cleaning Metal

You’ve never seen how versatile an angle grinder is until you’ve used it to clean metal. A wire brush or wheel attachment can be attached to the tool to give it the ability to scrape paint and rust cleanly off of metal while leaving very little marks in its wake.

These cleaning wheels come in a variety of different shapes and sizes for use on different cleaning tasks. For instance, deburring holes in metal would require a smaller brush, whereas removing paint off of large surfaces would be more efficient with a larger wheel. With a wire wheel, removing specks of dried cement and the most stubborn dirt stains is a breeze.

Dimensioning Tiles

Although there is a dedicated tool for reshaping tiles accurately (tile cutter), they’re not exactly versatile. An angle grinder, paired with a steady hand and eye for detail, can be used to slice through ceramic tiles accurately for fitting them into tight corners or making custom-sized holes for metal piping to pass through. Their small discs allow you to produce some rather intricate cuts and shapes; something that a regular tile cutter is incapable of.

What is the best angle grinder?

Sharpening Tools

There’s nothing worse than working with dull tools. Imagine poking the ground with your shovel only to have it bounce back and hit you in the stomach or cause an earthquake up your arms and body. Or what about using a lawn mower only to have the blades clumsily bat at blades of grass rather than chop them?

With an angle grinder, you can sharpen any metal tool you possess. Just take the grinding wheel with a standard blade attachment and graze the edge of your shovel or lawn mower blades ever-so-gently. Hold the angle grinder at an angle to give your tools a slight sharpness to it. Voila! You’ve just restored life back to your tools without any professional help.

Note: Sharpening tools using an angle grinder should be done with extreme caution since a slight knick in the tool can render it completely useless. Also, if the angle grinder knocks a piece of the metal tool off, it can go flying and hit you in the eye.

What are angle grinder discs made of?

Grinding Mortar

About once every 20 years or so, the existing mortar between bricks needs to be chiseled and replaced. This is because moisture from rain can cause the mortar to lose its structure, making it more prone to crumbling and diminish its holding power between bricks.

If you’re familiar with tuckpointing – removing an inch or so of mortar between bricks and replacing it with fresh mortar – then you already know how difficult and dangerous it can be to use a regular chisel and mallet. An angle grinder fitted with a tuckpointing wheel can make the task go by much more quickly and with better results.

Polishing Aluminum

If you’d like to restore the surface of an aluminum piece or sheet back to its former glory, then an angle grinder is a tool you definitely need. Polishing aluminum requires the use of several different grits of sanding discs to produce a smooth, reflective surface.

Once again, safety should be a priority. Only do this if you have safety goggles, a respirator (nobody wants flecks of aluminum in their lungs), and ear muffs or plugs.

How to Use an Angle Grinder Tool

Sanding and Smoothing All Sorts of Materials

Giving a smooth surface to ferrous and non-ferrous metals is to do with an angle grinder. Make sure you purchase the right sanding pad attachment and various grit sizes to give your metal pieces a squeaky-clean shine. You can smooth and sand metals including aluminum, steel, copper, iron, aluminum, and brass. An angle grinder can even smooth non-metal materials like fiberglass and wood. Talk about versatility!

Final Remarks

So there you have it, folks! These are seven of the main functions of an angle grinder. When we say an angle grinder is versatile, you better believe it can do more than just cut and shape your workpieces. Just remember that you can only do these things if you have the right types of attachments and at the right size.

What you can do with an Angle Grinder



Categories
Rotary Tools

Cordless vs Corded Dremels

A rotary tool has a number of different uses such as sanding, buffing, and cutting. Professional electricians, plumbers, home renovators, and even DIY-ers can find a rotary tool to serve some purpose one way or another.

Corded Dremel

One company that makes some of the most well-known rotary tools is Dremel; In fact, the company is so popular in the rotary tool industry that Dremel is used as shorthand when referring to any rotary tool. Dremel has been in the power tools industry for about 90 years now, and if their line of high-quality rotary tools has anything to say, it’d be that the company is dominating the small power tool’s market.


What is a Dremel Rotary Tool?

For those of you who aren’t familiar with what Dremel does, the company makes some handy small sized rotary tools for cutting, grinding, sanding, and polishing. These tools are rather small and can be operated using a single hand. Their small size allows them to reach places that large cutting tools like angle grinders and even some die grinders couldn’t access.

Something that makes Dremel rotary tools stand out, especially among beginner woodworkers or metal workers, is their simplicity. The body of a Dremel tool consists of an ON/OFF button and hardly anything else, though each model differs slightly.

Cordless vs Corded Dremel

Cordless vs. Corded Dremel Tools – Why the Dilemma?

In all honesty, the debate of whether you should get a cordless or a corded Dremel tool is one that will probably go on until the end of time. There are those who are fans of updated cordless power tools for their portability, and there are also those who prefer the uninterrupted power that power cords provide. When it comes to Dremel tools, both cordless and corded options exist, hence the dilemma.

In the following section, we’ll talk about the main features of both cordless and corded Dremel rotary tools and what you should consider before picking one up. Keep in mind that these are only suggestions and your situation may experience may differ from what we’ve experienced.

Cordless Dremel Rotary Tools

In this section, we’ll discuss both the good and bad about using a cordless Dremel.

Corded Dremel vs Cordless

Portability

The main attraction of cordless power tools is their supreme portability, and the same can be said for Dremel tools. There aren’t any power cords to tie you down, so as long as the battery has some juice in it, you can use the tool anywhere on the planet.

This is especially handy if you plan on doing overhead work or work on top of a ladder. You don’t want cables getting in your face and obstructing your vision, and you don’t want to juggle around with long power cords while keeping balance in high places.

Battery Life

The only way a cordless Dremel tool can run is if the battery has a charge. Most cordless Dremel tools come with batteries that can supply more than 30 minutes of use. Considering the size of the tool and power of the motor, this isn’t that great, but for most light-duty sanding/buffing/cutting jobs, this should be more than enough.

A good thing about Dremel’s cordless rotary tools is that their batteries require only about an hour of charging before reaching maximum capacity. This means reduced downtime and increased productivity. If possible, we recommend you avoid purchasing Dremel tools that use AA batteries instead of rechargeable Li-Ions since they drain the batteries much quicker.

Cordless Dremel Rotary Tool

Weak Motor

The main downside of cordless Dremel tools is that they come with weak motors, typically ranging between 6 and 12 volts. A 12-volt Dremel is the most versatile tool which can cut and grind through all sorts of materials, including metals. A 6-volt model would probably be best to trim your pet dog’s nails or other light-duty grinding jobs.

Corded Dremel Rotary Tools

Now, let’s take a look at what a corded-electric Dremel tool has in store. We’ll talk about the benefits of getting a corded model as well as any drawbacks.

Uninterrupted Power

As long as your home or workshop is supplied with a constant flow of electricity, a corded-electric Dremel will never give up. This means absolutely no downtime, but you do need to give the tool some time to rest to prevent the motor from overheating.

Dremel Corded

Stronger Motors

Drawing energy directly from a power outlet allows the Dremel tool to come equipped with larger motors for better performance. More powerful motors let the rotary tool cut through both hard and soft materials with a reduced risk of burning the motor. If you find yourself cutting metal regularly, you may want a corded Dremel tool on hand.

It would be best if you could find a powerful corded tool with variable speed. This increases the versatility of the Dremel tool by a lot – lower speeds for grinding metal and higher speeds for removing material from wood boards. A single-speed tool could only be helpful in only one of these scenarios.

Dremel Cordless

Restricted Movement

Your range of movement is limited by how long the power cord is. You could ultimately increase how far away from an outlet to use the tool by making use of long, durable extension cords, but now you’re stuck juggling two different cords at once. A simple tug might unplug the machine, causing the blade to slowly lose power and get stuck in your metal or wooden workpiece.

Verdict – Cordless or Corded?

So after reading our brief comparison of cordless and corded Dremel rotary tools, you should now have a better idea on which of the two would benefit you more. Essentially, a cordless Dremel tool lets you use it anywhere and everywhere, whereas a corded tool keeps you grounded.

In our humble opinion, if you can finish grinding/sanding/cutting jobs in less than 30 minutes, a cordless Dremel tool would be the better option. Light-duty projects don’t require you to spend hours hovering over your workpiece, so a cordless tool with a 30-minute battery would suffice.

On the other hand, if you’re into heavy-duty grinding through metal, a corded-electric Dremel tool with its never-ending supply of power and amazing cutting strength would suit you better. A variable speed feature on your Dremel would make the tool so much more versatile.

Corded Rotary Tool



Categories
Angle grinder Die Grinder Rotary Tools

Die Grinder vs Angle Grinder: Best Pick Comparison

Rotary tools are some of the most versatile tools. They can be used for heavy-duty jobs like cutting through thick steel beams or for precision work around car engines. Ultimately, it comes down to what type of rotary tool you’re using.

Angle Grinder vs Die Grinder

Angle Grinder

The two most common types of rotary tools are die grinders and angle grinders. For those of you who are unfamiliar with what either of these tools is, please continue reading. We’ll talk about what die grinders, and angle grinders are and what sets them apart. We’ll also give our two cents about which of the two would be more appropriate for certain jobs.


What is a Die Grinder?

A die grinder is a tool that’s used for grinding almost every type of material imaginable. It comes with a small nose that uses small-diameter attachments for a number of different applications. The most common materials that a die grinder is used on include plastics, metals, and wood, though they have enough power to grind away at concrete and ceramic tiles.

Some noses on die grinder models can reach speeds of up to 30,000 RPM. Between electric and pneumatic die grinders, pneumatic models can reach quicker speeds, thus giving it better grinding power.

Die Grinder vs Angle Grinder

Die Grinder

What can a Die Grinder do?

You can attach a wide range of different attachments to the nose of a die grinder to help you in whatever tasks you have at hand. The attachments are, at most about 1-19/32 inches in diameter, so they’re quite small and better for precision work. Here are just a few things you can do with a die grinder.

Cleaning and Polishing Metals

After welding two metal pieces together, your workpiece might be left with an unsightly bump that needs to be eradicated. In this scenario, you can turn to a die grinder to slowly grind away at the bump, giving your product a smooth, finished look. This can be done with a standard grinding wheel attachment, but you need to ensure that the wheel is designed for metal use and not just on wood. After the bump has been removed, swap out the grinding wheel for a polishing pad to give your piece a beautiful sheen.

Finishing Wood-Based Projects

Although belt sanders and drum sanders might be better for sanding large boards and blocks, a die grinder can also be a helpful tool to have during woodworking projects. If there are tiny blemishes or knots that you didn’t notice while preparing a full-sized board for building furniture, you can go over them with a die grinder to grind them flush with the rest of the surface area.

Angle Grinder

Angle Grinder

Removing Rust

Most people use die grinders to eliminate rust from metal workpieces. With a standard grinding wheel attachment, simply dig into the rusted area until you’ve reached pure, clean metal. With a die grinder, you can restore metal to its former glory and not have to go out to purchase new conduits or bars.

What is an Angle Grinder?

An angle grinder is also a rotary tool used to cut through tough materials like wood, plastic, and metal. The main differences between an angle grinder and a die grinder are the size and orientation of the grinding attachment. A die grinder’s nose juts straight out of the top of the tool, whereas the blade on an angle grinder is parallel to the handle.

An angle grinder is considerably larger than a die grinder. It comes with a secondary handle near the head of the tool for extra gripping power and stability when in use. There’s also a blade guard that covers the bottom portion of the blade in order to protect your hand from accidentally making contact.

What can an Angle Grinder do?

An angle grinder can do many of the things that a die grinder can. For instance, an angle grinder can clean metal, sand and smooth wood and metal objects, and polish metal and plastic surfaces. However, there are some advantages that the angle grinder’s larger disc – between 4-1/2 inches and 9 inches – can offer.

Die vs Angle Grinder

Die Grinder

Grind Mortar

When tuckpointing brick walls, you’ll need a long chisel or blade to chip away at the decaying mortar. An angle grinder’s larger blade allows you to reach further into the wall, scraping out more of the mortar in preparation for tuckpointing. Just make sure that the angle grinder is fitted with a blade safe for cutting through mortar and stone.

Sharpen Metal Tools

A shovel and lawn mower blade need to be sharpened frequently to support better digging and cutting abilities. You can resharpen these tools with an angle grinder. With the standard blade attachment, gently run the spinning blade over the edge of the metal tool at an angle. Continue doing this until the edge or point of the tool is razor sharp.

Polish Cars

You can technically polish a car’s body with an angle grinder and polishing wheel but only if you want to spend the next thousand years doing so. To make quick work out of polishing your vehicle, you can get a polishing pad for your angle grinder. It’ll work similarly to an orbital sander with a polishing pad attachment but without the random vibrations.

Angle vs die  Grinder

Angle Grinder

Die Grinder vs Angle Grinder – Which is Better?

Between the two, there’s really no way to determine which of them would be the better overall tool to have. Some projects call for the use of a die grinder while others would be completed much quicker and more effectively with an angle grinder.

Even though they can perform many of the same tasks, they’re two different rotary tools that serve different purposes. In a nutshell, a die grinder’s tiny nose allows you to make fine details and etches while an angle grinder’s larger blade makes it better suited for larger projects.

Both die grinders, and angle grinders aren’t extremely expensive tools to own and operate. If you need a rotary tool for fine detailing and one for quick sanding/buffing/cutting, we recommend investing in both.

Die Grinder

Die Grinder



Categories
Angle grinder Rotary Tools

Cut-Off Tool vs Angle Grinder: A Comparison Guide

When it comes to cutting tools, there are several saws and handheld rotary tools to choose from. Sometimes it can be confusing when distinguishing one from the other. For instance, what can a cut-off tool do that an angle grinder can’t and vice versaBoth cut-off tools and angle grinders are handheld power tools that can be used to cut and sharpen metal. Two main features can help you tell them apart – the size of the cutting disc and the orientation of the blade.

Angle Grinder vs Cut-Off Tool

Angle Grinder

In this article, we’ll talk about what each of these is, what they can do, and which of them would be the better overall tool to own.


What is a Cut-Off Tool?

A cut-off tool is a small, handheld tool with a disc that’s fitted perpendicularly to the shaft. They usually have motors of less than 1 HP, so they’re not designed for cutting through thick slabs of metal. Instead, if there are tiny welding beads or thin metal pieces that need to be sliced off, a cut-off tool would be the go-to tool to use.

What can a Cut-Off Tool do?

The most common size cutting disc on a cut-off tool is 3 inches. The small-sized blade makes the tool ideal for cutting through thin pieces of metal and tiny welding beads. The tool is also rather compact – about six inches from head to bottom – so fitting into tight spaces under the hood of your car is possible with one of these tools in your hand.

Cut-off tools can use one of two sources of power – air and electricity. Pneumatic cut-off tools are the more powerful variety and are primarily used for automotive jobs such as cutting off hose clamps, mufflers, bolts, and sheet metal. Electric cut-off tools are larger than their pneumatic counterparts but pack a weaker punch. They’re mainly used for light-duty metalwork like cutting conduits and sheet metal.

Cut-Off Tool vs Angle Grinder

Cut-Off Tool

Downsides of a Cut-Off Tool

Whether you want to consider it a drawback or not, the cut-off tool comes with a small-diameter cutting disc meant for precision work. For large projects, this is an inefficient tool that would take forever or be unable to slice through thick metal bars and beams.

What is an Angle Grinder?

An angle grinder also referred to as a side grinder or disc grinder, is a handheld power tool that can be used for a wide range of applications. Compared to a cut-off tool, an angle grinder comes with a much larger grinding disc – between 4-1/2 and 9 inches – for heavy-duty jobs.

The disc is locked onto a spindle and juts outward in the direction of the trigger. The blade is parallel to the handle and comes with a blade guard to protect your hands and fingers from accidentally making contact with the spinning disc. There’s also a second handle (movable from left to right) that gives you a better grip and better control when grinding and buffing.

Angle Grinder

Angle Grinder

What can an Angle Grinder do?

An angle grinder can be used on many different materials – plastic, metal, mortal, and wood. It’s a handy tool to have regardless of what type of work you do.

Angle grinders are extremely versatile tools that can do just about anything that any rotary tool can do. Cutting welding beads, buffing your vehicle’s body, finish woodworking projects, getting rid of pesky nails, eliminating rust, grinding mortar in preparation for tuckpointing – the list goes on.

This tool is mainly found in metalworking and automotive shops for cutting thick bars, nuts, hose clamps, beams, poles, and sheet metal. However, woodworkers looking to make final touches on their products and plumbers who need to cut through copper pipes can also find value in an angle grinder.

Cut-Off Tool

Cut-Off Tool

Downsides of an Angle Grinder

When working in cramped spaces like closets or under the hood of your car, an angle grinder’s large disc can be quite troublesome. Imagine trying to maneuver the tool to the side of your car’s engine to chop through a rusted nut only to accidentally shave away at the engine’s cover. Not a pretty thought…

Another downside of having such a large grinding wheel is that an angle grinder isn’t exactly the right tool for detailing. If you want to add fancy carvings in stone or need to chop through small, delicate metal bars, we recommend sticking to a die grinder or even a cut-off tool.

Angle Grinder

Angle Grinder

Cut-Off Tool vs. Angle Grinder – Which is Better?

So now we that understand what a cut-off tool and an angle grinder can do, how do we determine which of them is the overall better tool to have?

Ultimately, it depends on what you plan on doing. Take a look at the size of the materials you use on a regular basis. If you need to slice through anything thicker than 3 inches, then a cut-off tool isn’t the right tool for the job. If you primarily deal with tiny pieces or thin sheets of aluminum, then an angle grinder might be overkill.

Cut-Off Tool vs Angle Grinder

Cut-Off Tool

You should also be aware of where you plan on performing your cutting tasks. An angle grinder won’t be able to fit into cramped spaces so unless you plan on working out in the open, a cut-off tool for cutting through metal would be the better option.

The good thing about both cut-off tools and angle grinders is that they’re not too amazingly expensive to purchase. Also, if you’re looking to give your air compressor a workout, there are pneumatic versions of both of these tools. They also require about the same PSI and CFM count so if your air compressor works for one; it’ll work for the other as well.

Final Remarks

Like so many rotary tools out there, the differences between a cut-off tool and an angle grinder are minor. They can both be used to saw off pieces of metal, but the difference in blade size indicates that one is for smaller tasks while the other can handle larger projects. Choose the tool that you’ll end up using more depending on what type of tasks you have at hand.

Angle Grinder

Angle Grinder



Categories
Angle grinder Rotary Tools

Best Angle Die Grinders in 2019

Die grinders are extremely powerful tools that can be used in a wide range of applications. Their main purpose is to grind away pieces of metal, but the right die grinder can be used on wood and plastic as well. You can install different attachments for grinding, smoothing, buffing, and finishing all sorts of projects as long as you have an angle die grinder by your side.

Ingersoll Rand 301B Air Angle Die Grinder

Ingersoll Rand 301B

Angle Die Grinder Buying Guide

The most important thing we have to ask ourselves is what exactly makes the “right” angle grinderTake a look at our brief buying guide below and get an idea of what specs and features to look out for.


Motor Power

One of the first things to consider when looking for an angle die grinder is how powerful its motor is. The motor will control the speed and torque of the grinding wheel. For both DIY-ers and construction workers, you really don’t need a super-beefy motor; try finding a model that has at least ¼ horsepower.

Ingersoll Rand 3101G Angle Die Grinder

Ingersoll Rand 3101G

Speed Control

Even though most people use the highest speed on their angle die grinder, some jobs call for slower speeds, such as grinding on wood boards and plastic tubing. A great maximum speed that should offer maximum work efficiency while keeping vibrations down to a minimum is around 20,000 RPM.

Power Source

There are three main power sources for angle die grinders: corded-electric, cordless, and pneumatic. If you already have an air compressor in your garage/workshop or plan on purchasing one in the near future, we highly recommend getting a pneumatic angle die grinder. A cordless model would be second best, though you should know that their batteries won’t last you very long per charge. Corded-electric models that are comfortable to grip and maneuver are hard to come by.

Chicago Pneumatic CP875 Angle Die Grinder

Chicago Pneumatic CP875

PSI and CFM Ratings

If you decide to get a cordless or corded-electric die grinder, then you can ignore this step. If you’re looking for another air-powered tool to add to your collection, then make sure that your air compressor can provide enough CFM at the right PSI.

Generally, the speed and power behind a pneumatic angle die grinder are relative to how much air is forced through the tool (more air at a greater pressure means more RPM). As long as your compressor can work at the die grinder’s minimum air volume and pressure requirements, you and your pneumatic die grinder can get straight to business.

Ingersoll Rand 301B Air Angle Die Grinder

Ingersoll Rand 301B

Right-Angle or Straight Head

Right-angle die grinders are all the rage, but certain jobs can be completed more easily with a straight head tool. It all comes down to personal preference, but we feel that a right-angle offers more comfort and can reach tight spaces sufficiently. Furthermore, right-angle die grinders are the better option if you want to mount grinding wheels.

Size

Your line of work will determine how big of a die is necessary to complete your jobs. For instance, when working under the hood of your car, you might not need a large tool (e.g., 2-inch die). If you’re grinding masonry or metal tubes, using a ¼-inch die might be frustrating since it’ll take you forever before you can call it a day. Find a size that works best for your line of work.

Ingersoll Rand 5102MAX Angle Die Grinder

Ingersoll Rand 5102MAX

What Can you do With an Angle Grinder?

Top 5 Angle Die Grinders

Angle die grinders are all compact, lightweight, and have a similar look, making finding the right tool a bit of a challenge. No need to fret; we’re here to help you find the right model for your arsenal of power tools.

The following segment contains our picks of the top five best angle die grinders available today. Note to the reader: these are all pneumatic models (we’re not discriminating against corded-electric and cordless models, but pneumatic models simply provide the best power, speed, and flexibility out of all the different die grinders out there).

5 DEWALT DWMT70782L Angle Die Grinder

The first item on our list of the top five best angle die grinders is the DWMT70782L from DEWALT. This tool lives up to the exceptional name that DEWALT has set for itself. First, its motor is able to reach a free speed up to 20,000 RPM, and users have the ability to deliver as much speed as they want with the help of the touch control trigger.

This is a right-angle, pneumatic tool that depends on how much power your air compressor can provide, but it works optimally with only 3.0 CFM at 90 PSI. The DWMT70782L features a ¼-inch collet that takes in both ¼- and 1/8-inch attachments.

DEWALT DWMT70782L Angle Die Grinder

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4 Ingersoll Rand 5102MAX Angle Die Grinder

The 5102MAX from Ingersoll Rand is another great pneumatic angle die grander worth noticing. It’s a lightweight tool with a ¼-inch collet. It takes 6 CFM at 90 PSI to run optimally at a speed of up to 25,000 RPM.

However, its 0.4-HP motor allows users to choose different speeds between 20,000 and 25,000 RPM for use on different materials. This is one of the most comfortable tools to use, even at awkward angles in hard-to-reach spaces under your car or in between steel pipes. One of the best things about the 5102MAX is it produces relatively low noise when working – up to 95.1 decibels on the highest speed.

Ingersoll Rand 5102MAX Angle Die Grinder

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3 Chicago Pneumatic CP875 Angle Die Grinder

The CP875 from Chicago Pneumatic is, you guessed it, another masterfully crafted pneumatic angle die grinder. It’s a ¼-inch tool that requires 5.5 CFM at 90 PSI to run at the highest speed (22,500 RPM). It has variable speed options so users can grind away at all sorts of materials, from PVC pipes to stainless steel bars.

The 90° head offers flexibility to work in tight spaces without accidentally grinding away at nearby objects. The CP875 is a bit louder than what you would normally expect from such a compact tool – around 112 decibels – but it works like a charm and requires very little maintenance.

Chicago Pneumatic CP875 Angle Die Grinder

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2 Ingersoll Rand 3101G Angle Die Grinder

The second-place item on our list is another one of Ingersoll Rand’s ingenious angle die grinders – the 3101G. This lightweight yet durable tool comes with a 1/3-HP motor and a ¼-inch collet. It needs 3 CFM at 90 PSI to reach its highest speed of 20,000 RPM. You can decide how much speed to deliver by adjusting the CFM and PSI settings on your air compressor, though some users found that even the slightest deviation from the 3 CFM at 90 PSI setting could drastically alter speed and performance.

The 3101G is an ergonomic right-angle die grinder that fits in tight quarters with ease. We especially like how well the exhaust port works, but we wish it were a forward-facing port that helps keep your work surface clean.

Ingersoll Rand 3101G Angle Die Grinder

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1 Ingersoll Rand 301B Air Angle Die Grinder

The best angle die grinder you can get, in our humble opinion, is another one of Ingersoll Rand’s pneumatic tools: the 301B. Unlike the other tools on our list, the 301B is encased in an aluminum housing that can withstand working in the toughest environment and sustain drops.

It features a ¼-HP motor that can reach a free speed of up to 21,000 RPM when air passes through the tool at 6 CFM and 90 PSI. Like the other Ingersoll Rand tools mentioned earlier, you need to play around with the CFM and PSI settings of your air compressor to adjust the grinding speed, though the speed is considerably much easier to control compared to the others.

Ingersoll Rand 301B Air Angle Die Grinder

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Final Remarks

Every mechanic and serious woodworker should have an angle die grinder in their collection of power tools. It’s not the perfect replacement for a full-sized angle grinder, but it works exceedingly well in tight spaces and at weird, uncomfortable angles. You can rest assured that despite sticking the tool in between pipes or cables, with a steady hand, you won’t feel the weight or vibrations of the tool at all.

DEWALT DWMT70782L Angle Die Grinder

DEWALT DWMT70782L

When looking for a reliable die angle grinder, there are several important features and specs to consider. These include how powerful the motor is (measured in horsepower), whether it offers the ability to control speeds for effective work on different materials, its power source (corded-electric, cordless, or pneumatic), how much CFM and PSI it needs to operate (pneumatic tools only), the angle of the head, and the size and weight of the tool. Make sure that you find a tool that meets your expectations and fits within the working capacity of your air compressor.

In this article, we’ve provided you with our picks of the five best angle die grinders available today. Essentially, we feel that Ingersoll Rand dominates the pneumatic angle die grinder tools market.

Ingersoll Rand 301B Air Angle Die Grinder

Ingersoll Rand 301B

From their selection of impressive pneumatic tools, we feel that the best angle die grinder you can get is the 301B with its amazing speed, easy-to-controllability, and compact size and lightweight. Its aluminum casing really helps in keeping the tool from damage that could potentially ruin how accurately and consistently it works.



Categories
Bench Grinder Rotary Tools

WEN vs DEWALT Bench Grinder

Bench grinders are similar to angle grinders, but most likely the common man won’t find a need to use or purchase a bench grinder throughout their metalworking or woodworking career. However, they are extremely useful tools for sharpening tool bits, drill bits, gouges, and chisels. Essentially, bench grinders can be used to extend the life of your valuable, and sometimes pricey, metal bits in the workshop.

WEN 4276 vs DEWALT DW758 Bench Grinder Comparison

WEN 4276

In this article, we’re going to take a look at two popular dual-wheel bench grinders available on the market. The WEN 4276 Bench Grinder is celebrated as being an affordable but highly effective grinder, whereas the DEWALT DW758 Bench Grinder is more known for its compact design and top-notch performance in shaping metal pieces and tool bits. Both of these units have received praise from industry experts and customers alike, but which of the two would suit your workshop moreLet’s see how these two bench grinders compare.

DEWALT DW758 vs WEN 4276 Bench Grinder Comparison

DEWALT DW758

Motor

WEN 4276
First of all, the motor determines how much speed and how consistently the abrasive wheels will spin, which in turn should give you a feel of how well the bench grinder will sharpen your tools and prepare metal pieces for welding. The WEN 4276 features a 2.1 amp motor which is quiet when starting up and delivers up to 3,450 RPM.

DEWALT DW758
The DEWALT DW758 features a ¾-horsepower induction motor which puts it among some of the most powerful bench grinders available on the market. The large 4.2 amp motor delivers a maximum speed of 3,600 RPM. When switching the unit on, the powerful motor causes the wheels to spin and reach their max speed almost immediately, but it produces a considerable amount of noise when starting up.

Conclusion
Despite the small RPM difference, we much prefer the DEWALT bench grinder. You’ll need all the speed and power you can get, especially when sharpening metal bits and bringing them back to life.

WEN 4276 vs DEWALT DW758

WEN 4276

Wheel Size and Distance between Wheels

WEN 4276
Both of these models use a dual-wheel build which helps in sharpening or removing rust or other unwanted materials from long metal pieces. The WEN uses two 6 x ¾-inch wheels with a ½-inch arbor hole. The distance between the two abrasive wheels doesn’t matter in this unit since the 6-inch wheels don’t protrude far enough past the engine to accommodate using both wheels simultaneously to grind long pieces of metal.

DEWALT DW758
On the other hand, the distance between the two wheels of the DEWALT is 12-1/2 inches long, and the 8 x 1-inch wheels with ½-inch arbor hole size extend far past the motor so sharpening mower blades or other long tools is possible with using both spinning wheels.

Conclusion
Once again, the DEWALT trumps over the budget-friendly WEN. The DW758’s larger wheel size makes it great for sharpening tools effectively and efficiently. You can even feed long tools into both wheels simultaneously since the wheels stick out past the unit’s motor.

DEWALT DW758 vs WEN 4276

DEWALT DW758

Weight

WEN 4276
The weight of a bench grinder is important since, in combination with the base or feet of the unit, it’ll help with managing vibrations. The WEN is the more lightweight of the two, weighing in at only 16 pounds including the two abrasive wheels that come with the kit. It’s extremely lightweight, meaning that taking it from place to place won’t be an issue, and it hardly takes up any space on your workbench.

DEWALT DW758
The DEWALT weighs about 39.5 pounds and doesn’t come with rubber feet like the WEN does. However, the added weight keeps the unit stable when sharpening metal or wooden pieces. It’s not all that difficult to carry around and load onto your truck, and it’s also a relatively compact unit that won’t take up too much space on your table.

Conclusion
It’s up to the user to determine whether 16 pounds with rubber feet beat the 39.5-pound DEWALT. In our opinion, we prefer the added weight of the DEWALT which helps keep the unit from rocking excessively when sharpening tools. It’s also completely portable so the WEN doesn’t win any points in that sector.

WEN 4276

WEN 4276

Work Light

WEN 4276
Having a built-in work light on your bench grinder isn’t that much needed, especially since common sense dictates that we shouldn’t operate power tools in complete darkness. However, if you need a work light which faces directly at the surface you’re grinding or sharpening, then the WEN’s fitted light could be what you’re looking for. However, it only works when the unit is on and running, and the vibrations can cause the light to move slightly.

DEWALT DW758
The DEWALT doesn’t come with a built-in light for illuminating the object you’re sharpening. Once again, it doesn’t really matter since you’re going to be working in well-lit areas anyways, but if you need to use this bench grinder in a dark room, then you’ll have to bring an external source of light.

Conclusion
The WEN wins by default. The built-in light, though rather flimsy, shines a bright light on the pieces you’re sharpening. As for the DEWALT, you’ll have to bring your own flashlight to maintain visibility in the dark.

DEWALT DW758

DEWALT DW758

Included Wheels

WEN 4276
This model includes two wheels so you can get right to work: one 36-grit coarse wheel and one 60-grit fine wheel. The coarse-grit wheel serves to take out larger pieces of rust or unwanted material from your metal pieces, whereas the fine-grit wheel works to polish or to get rid of a very fine layer of your drill bits and metal tools.

DEWALT DW758
This kit doesn’t include any attachments, lights, or wheels. You’ll have to purchase the 8 x 1-inch wheels separately. This is done mainly since you can attach two similar grit wheels to sharpen long pieces of metal. Once again, you’ll have to shell out a few bucks to purchase wheelsets.

Conclusion
Once again, the WEN wins in terms of the included wheels. However, in our experience, WEN attachments, including these coarse- and fine-grit wheels, have somewhat of a short life, meaning you’ll need to purchase replacements quite frequently to maintain productivity.

WEN 4276 vs DEWALT DW758 Bench Grinder Comparison

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WEN 4276 vs DEWALT DW758: Bottom Line

Between the WEN and the DEWALT, we prefer the DEWALT much more. Despite the missing light and wheels, DEWALT makes a fine selection of course- and fine-grit wheels, as well as external light sources, which you can purchase, albeit separately, to get your bench grinder up and running. Power-wise, there’s only a slight difference between the two bench grinders, but the large distance between wheels of the DEWALT DW758 make this the better choice. The 6-inch wheels of the WEN 4276 Bench Grinder limit how much grinding you can do on a single long piece of metal (e.g. chisel).

DEWALT DW758 vs WEN 4276 Bench Grinder Comparison

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Categories
Angle grinder Rotary Tools

DEWALT DWE402 vs DCG413B Angle Grinder

Woodworkers and metalworkers of all levels of expertise turn to angle grinders for grinding, cutting, and polishing applications. This versatile tool can be used in professional settings and for home projects alike. Before purchasing an angle grinder, there are several specs to take into account, namely the disc size, the power of the motor, speed, and overall comfort when handling the power tool.

DEWALT DWE402 vs DCG413B Angle Grinder Comparison

DEWALT DWE402

Today, we’re going to take a look at two of DEWALT’s most highly-rated angle grinders – the DWE402 and the DCG413B Angle Grinder. A quick online search will show you that they’ve collected quite a large number of positive assessments from their customers. The only thing left to do is consider which of these two angle grinders would work best for you in the long-term. Without further ado, let’s jump right into our comparison. Hopefully, this article will give you an idea on which of these two angle grinders would work best for you for every task at hand.

DEWALT DCG413B vs DWE402 Angle Grinder Comparison

DEWALT DCG413B

Corded vs Cordless

DWE402
In general, corded angle grinders deliver more power compared to their cordless counterparts. Of course, the tradeoff is portability and maneuverability. With a corded option such as the DWE402 angle grinder, your range of motion is limited to the somewhat bothersome cord.

DCG413B
The cordless DCG41B is more portable and easier to navigate, though operation times are limited by how much juice is in the battery. The good thing about this model is that since it features a brushless motor (more on this later), you get to use it for extended periods of time (compared to cordless models with brushed motors). This kit doesn’t include a battery pack, and we recommend purchasing a 6.0 amp battery since it holds can hold a longer charge and delivers consistent power.

Conclusion: Depending on where and how often you plan on using an angle grinder, either the corded or cordless could be the way to go. If you purchase multiple 6.0 amp batteries for the DEWALT DCG413B angle grinder, you’ll be able to run the unit for hours on end while the other batteries charge up. With the DEWALT DWE402, you only need to purchase a long extension cord though it increases the risk of tangling and becomes a tripping hazard.

DEWALT DWE402 vs DCG413B

DEWALT DWE402

What Can you do With an Angle Grinder?

Motor and Speed

DWE402
There are two motor types to look out for – brushed and brushless. Brushed motors tend to produce more heat, creating the need for high-frequency maintenance, whereas brushless motors can dissipate heat better and reach high speeds. The DWE402 comes with a brushed 11.0 amp motor which delivers up to 11,000 RPM.

DCG413B
This model comes with a brushless motor which is 50% more power-efficient than brushed, cordless models. However, the motor is considerably weaker and produces only around 9,000 RPM.

Conclusion: With angle grinders, speed is a necessary spec to take into account, and the 11.0 amp brushed motor of the DWE402 outclasses the DCG413B by roughly 2,000 RPM. In this regard, we prefer the brushed former to the brushless latter, though you will save energy and maintenance costs with the DCG413B.

DEWALT DCG413B vs DWE402

DEWALT DCG413B

Weight

DWE402
The weight of the angle grinder also plays a role in portability, and it contributed to operator fatigue or lack thereof. The DEWALT DWE402 angle grinder weights roughly 6 pounds which is considerably heavier than other comparable angle grinders on the market, though some could argue that since the unit will be operated with both hands, the somewhat heavier build of the unit won’t cause any significant levels of fatigue.

DCG413B
On the opposite side of the weight-spectrum, the DEWALT DCG413B weighs only around 3.75 pounds (including battery). This entry-level angle grinder is weightless, even with one-handed operation. Even though it’s not the lightest cordless model out there, if the unit’s weight is a large concern, you have nothing to worry about with the DCG413B.

Conclusion: We feel that weight is, indeed, a significant point of consideration before purchasing an angle grinder, and we commend the DCG413B for being lightweight. If you’ve ever used an angle grinder before, you’ll know that fitting the disc into tight spaces at awkward angles is a hassle, and the featherweight build of this angle grinder makes it the preferred choice.

DEWALT DWE402 Angle Grinder

DEWALT DWE402

Dust Ejection System

DWE402
The buildup of dust and debris can cause problems to both the material you’re working on and the unit. Typically, we look for tools that come with a built-in dust collection or ejection system, and we’re glad to say that the DEWALT DWE402 features just that. The unit’s cooling fan shoots little gusts of wind to eject any debris through the bottom.

DCG413B
This cordless angle grinder, unfortunately, does not have an implemented dust ejection system, meaning that you’ll need to manually bring your vacuum hose to the wood or metal piece you’re grinding. It’s not entirely a deal-breaker, though it’s a rather important point to take into consideration.

Conclusion: The clear winner is the DWE402’s dust ejection system which, we found, does an excellent job of collecting sawdust and debris and ejecting them through the bottom part of the angle grinder.

DEWALT DCG413B Angle Grinder

DEWALT DCG413B

Potential users of the angle grinder

DWE402
There’s really no clear line in distinguishing whether an angle grinder is great when used for professional or DIY projects, though there are some ways to draw the line. For example, we find that the DWE402’s greater power and larger build make it more suited for professional contract workers who need a reliable angle grinder for taking to multiple job sites.

DCG413B
On the other hand, the DEWALT DCG413B could be a great tool for professional craftsmen, especially if they’re in need of a cordless model, but we find that this model is more suited for DIY hobbyists. This is mainly due to the weaker motor and lower RPM-count.

Conclusion: Once again, users need to distinguish which of these tools will work for them. In some cases, home DIY projects require heavy-duty tools, and contract jobs might only need light- to medium-duty equipment. In our opinion, the DWE402’s overall higher-rated power and speed make it the better all-around tool.

DEWALT DWE402 vs DCG413B Angle Grinder Comparison

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DEWALT DWE402 vs DCG413B: Bottom Line

In some ways, these two tools can’t really go head to head. Corded versus cordless is just one example of where a customer’s subjective perception really dictates their purchase decision. However, when we look at the tools and their overall specs, we find that the DWE402 angle grinder is the better choice. In our minds, brushless beats brushed every time, but only when comparing tools that deliver the same or similar powers and speeds.

Although the 6-pound build of the DEWALT DWE402 might be a put-off for some people, we find that even in tight spaces and awkward angles, it’s still rather comfortable to hold and navigate, even when operating the unit one-handedly. However, one thing we didn’t like about either of these models is their lack of variable speed controls, meaning you’re stuck with working at their maximum speeds for even delicate surfaces. That’s just something to keep in mind.

DEWALT DCG413B vs DWE402 Angle Grinder Comparison

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Best Angle Grinder: Buying Guide



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Angle grinder Rotary Tools

Hitachi vs. DEWALT Angle Grinder

Handymen turn to one tool for their grinding, cutting, and polishing needs – the angle grinder. This handheld power tool (also referred to as a side grinder or a disc grinder) can be used on a number of different surfaces. Users often find purposes for angle grinders in their garages, construction job sites, and metalworking shops. When purchasing an angle grinder, specs like disc size, motor power, speed ratings, and comfort when operating are the most important factors take into account.

Hitachi G12SR4 vs DEWALT DWE402 Angle Grinder Comparison

Hitachi G12SR4

In this article, we’re going to take an in-depth look at two extremely popular and highly-rated angle grinders – the Hitachi G12SR4 and the DEWALT DWE402. Both have received an overwhelming amount of positive reviews among buyers and experts. The only question left to ask is between the two, which one could potentially give more valueWithout taking too much time, let’s begin our comparison of the Hitachi G12SR4 and the DEWALT DWE402 Angle Grinder.

DEWALT DWE402 vs Hitachi G12SR4 Angle Grinder Comparison

DEWALT DWE402

Motor Power and Variable Speed

Hitachi G12SR4
One of the most important specs to consider is how much power is packed into the built-in motor in your angle grinder. The Hitachi features a 6.2 amp motor with a maximum output of 980W. The motor delivers up to 10,000 RPM. The best thing about this unit is that it comes with a variable speed controller, making it extremely versatile and able to accommodate a wide number of different wheels with varying maximum speed capacities.

DEWALT DWE402
The DEWALT model features an 11.0 amp motor and a maximum output of 1,400W. Wheels attached to the unit can reach a maximum speed of 11,000 RPM. However, for any angle grinder out there, it’s important to respect the maximum speed capacity of every wheel attached to the unit. Unfortunately, the DEWALT doesn’t come with a variable speed option so you’ll have to exercise extreme caution when attempting to attach lower max-RPM capacity discs.

We find that the tradeoff of maximum RPM for variable speed controls is the better choice, thus making the Hitachi angle grinder better than the DEWALT in our books. The versatility of the unit and its ability to handle a wide range of different discs with different speed ratings are a huge plus. However, if you’re exclusively using the angle grinder for disc attachments with 11,000 RPM speed ratings, the DEWALT would obviously be the better choice.

Hitachi G12SR4 vs DEWALT DWE402

Hitachi G12SR4

Weight

Hitachi G12SR4
The weight of the unit plays a role in operator fatigue and productivity. The Hitachi weighs in at only 4 pounds, making it a lightweight solution for grinding and polishing surfaces. Being so lightweight, we found no problems with grinding metal and wood surfaces for extended periods of time.

DEWALT DWE402
The DWE402 weighs roughly 6.2 pounds with a disc attachment. It’s not that much heavier than the Hitachi, though theoretically speaking, it should lead to operator fatigue a little bit quicker than the Hitachi, we found that the added weight doesn’t lead to any problems. In fact, in most cases, a heavier angle grinder leads to greater control and more effective grinding and polishing results when working horizontally.

Between these two lightweight models, it’s a little difficult determining which one is the better choice. Some users prefer heavier builds for improved control. However, if you’re looking for something that’s virtually weightless, the Hitachi would be the better option.

DEWALT DWE402 vs Hitachi G12SR4

DEWALT DWE402

What Can you do With an Angle Grinder?

Dimensions

Hitachi G12SR4
The overall size of the unit determines how well it’ll fit in tight spaces and be operated at angles of all sorts. The G12SR4 measures 10 x 4 x 4 inches, making it somewhat compact and able to fit in a number of tight-fitting spaces. Combined with the super lightweight-build, there’s nothing to not like about this Hitachi-made angle grinder.

DEWALT DWE402
On the other side of the spectrum, the DWE402 measures 15.6 x 5.9 x 4.8 inches. To be fair, it’s still rather compact and able to work beautifully in tight corners, but it requires much more muscle and energy to apply the spinning discs accurately in hard-to-reach places.

The Hitachi G12SR4 wins this battle. The compact design is a great feature that we just didn’t find in the DWE402. If you plan on working in tight places or on small surfaces, the Hitachi would be the better angle grinder for you.

Hitachi G12SR4

Hitachi G12SR4

Swapping Discs

Hitachi G12SR4
We found that changing discs in the G12SR4 is rather simple to do. You’ll need an external wrench to loosen the spindle that grabs hold onto whatever attachment you fit into the unit. It doesn’t take much time to loosen and tighten the spindle, meaning you’re not losing much time swapping out discs.

DEWALT DWE402
On the other hand, the DWE402’s quick spindle lock doesn’t require any hand tools to loosen and tighten the spindle. When you place a new disc into the unit, just press the lock button on the top-facing panel of the unit. It’s simple to do, and it keeps a tight clamp on the attachment to prevent accidents.

Swapping discs in both of these units is extremely easy to do. However, we prefer the tool-less method of loosening and tightening the spindle of the DWE402. If you prefer, you can also use an Allen wrench to remove and tighten the spindle, though we found that it just takes up time, and there’s no built-in pocket to place the wrench.

DEWALT DWE402

DEWALT DWE402

Hitachi G12SR4 vs DEWALT DWE402: Conclusion

At the end of the day, we prefer the Hitachi G12SR4 to the DEWALT DWE402. The reasons are simple: the Hitachi features a speed variable control, making it able to accommodate a wide number of discs with varying maximum speed ratings; and it’s compact and lightweight, meaning that working in hard-to-reach spaces or overhead doesn’t take much effort, effectively reducing the risk of fatigue. The DEWALT DWE402 Angle Grinder has some of its moments in the sun as well, especially when it comes to swapping discs.

Hitachi G12SR4 vs DEWALT DWE402 Angle Grinder Comparison

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However, we find that the better disc-swapping capability of the DEWALT is insignificant compared to the overall performance you get with the Hitachi. If you’re in the market for a 4-1/2-inch, entry-level angle grinder, we’d recommend the Hitachi G12SR4 Angle Grinder any day of the week.

DEWALT DWE402 vs Hitachi G12SR4 Angle Grinder Comparison

Check how much you can save, buying the DEWALT DWE402 Angle Grinder on Amazon >>>

Best Angle Grinder: Buying Guide