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A-Check Cleaning Dust Extractors

Best Dust Extractors for Woodworking in 2020

Keeping a clean workspace in an environment where cement and wood dust can go airborne is extremely important. By staying in an environment cluttered with tiny pieces of debris, you’re putting your well-being at risk, and that’s not even including the number of dangerous power tools you’re in close proximity with all day.

One of the best ways to prevent debris from accumulating and going airborne in your workshop is by using a dust extractor. A dust extractor is a portable piece of equipment that suctions up debris at the source and without the overly long hoses. They can connect directly to power tools and remove dust as it’s created, or used as a stand-alone tool to pick up piles and piles of debris.



Dust Extractor vs. Shop Vac – What’s the Difference?

One of the most commonly asked questions regarding dust management and cleanup is what differentiates a dust extractor from a shop vacAnd how do they differ from a standard vacuum cleaner?

Dust Extractor

Dust extractors are an excellent solution for cleaning industrial pollution. They’re a portable solution for picking up dust and other minuscule contaminants as they’re produced to prevent them from going airborne.

The biggest advantage that a dust extractor has over other forms of dust management systems is its ability to suction up concentrated piles of debris. Any piece that’s suctioned through the hose gets trapped in a built-in filter before clean air is pushed out of the machine.

Some models even serve as an extension cord. They come with outlets which let user plug their power tools directly into the machine.

Shop-Vac

Shop vacs are arguably the most popular and most basic form of a dust management system for workshops. They are large units that are placed in the corner of a workshop with long pressure hoses that run along the wall of the shop. These hoses connect directly to power tools to pick up dust and debris right as they’re created.

Most models feature a one-stage system that sorts the debris based on size. This helps in keeping the filter from accidental punctures and early clogging. However, their suction power is extremely dependent on the lengths of the hoses and how many are running simultaneously.

Dust Classes

The term “dust management” is extremely vague. The first thing you should know about dust management is that dust exists in many forms. They fall into three main categories: class L, class M, and class H.

Class L dust is the simplest form that is commonly found inside of households. It can be anything from dead skin cells to pieces of dirt. Class M dust includes sawdust, cement dust, tile residue, and pieces of dry paint. Class H is the most hazardous type which includes asbestos, mineral fibers, and glass wool.

Dust Extractor Buying Guide

In today’s article, we’re going to split the buying guide into three main parts – how to find the right model for woodworking, for MDF, and for general workshops.

Dust Extractor for Woodworking Buying Guide

There’s no doubt that a woodshop should have some sort of dust management system, and a simple vacuum cleaner doesn’t count. In this article, we’re going to go over what sort of things to look for when shopping for a dust extractor to have to prevent sawdust from getting into your hair and lungs.

Class

The dust produced from woodworking projects is categorized as class M dust. Most dust extractors are built to handle class M dust which includes sawdust and cement dust so finding an appropriate model should not prove to be too difficult.

It’s important that you also consider the type of filter that comes with the dust extractor. We would highly recommend seeking a model that features HEPA-grade filters that capture 99.97% of dust as small as 0.3 microns in diameter. However, a standard mesh could also be found, especially if you’re power tools that produce more chips and shavings than sawdust.

CFM

CFM refers to the volume of air in cubic feet that a dust extractor suctions up every minute. More is not always better when it comes to CFM; the appropriate rating truly depends on what sort of power tools you’re using and/or how much dust is accumulated and needs to be removed.

Depending on what tools you use, you may need a moderate machine that produces around 150 CFM or one as powerful as 300 CFM. We’d recommend leaning toward a higher CFM model for better performance.

Maneuverability

The biggest benefit that a dust extractor has over shop vacs are the caster wheels that allow it to travel wherever it’s needed. Depending on the size of your workshop and how many tools you have, the dust extractor should be able to easily find its way around the shop without bumping tables or getting its wheels caught.

Furthermore, a lightweight model would be ideal when you need to transport the unit from location to location. They’re pretty compact so fitting it onto the bed of your truck or in a vehicle shouldn’t cause too many problems.

Anti-Static Hose

Even though dust extractors serve to prevent sawdust from accumulating and becoming a fire hazard, the unit’s hose could become what it’s designed to prevent. The friction produced by millions of sawdust particles sliding up and down the hose creates static electricity which could ignite the dust, setting your entire woodshop ablaze.

To prevent static electricity buildup, make sure that the dust collector comes with an anti-static hose. Some models may not include them in the kit so if there aren’t any compatible anti-static hoses sold separately. It’s best to leave that model alone.

Dust Extractor for MDF Buying Guide

Even though MDF is used in woodworking, a dust extractor specifically for taking care of MDF residue is necessary. MDF includes the use of resin to give it its shape and density which, in powder form, can be a significant health hazard. Let’s see what sort of dust extractor is equipped to handle MDF sawdust.

Class

MDF is a type of engineered board used mainly in woodworking. Even though the majority of its construction is made of either hardwood or softwood, chemicals are introduced to give the board its structure and smooth surface. Therefore, sawdust from MDF is classified as a chemical and thus falls into class H dust.

CFM

Even though sawdust from MDF boards contains chemicals, the shape and size of the residue depends on what sort of tools are used to prep the board. For instance, planers and jointers produce shavings and chips which will require a higher CFM rating to suction up effectively. A router, table saw, and a drill will produce sawdust which can be cleaned up with a lower CFM dust extractor.

The “right” CFM rating depends on what tools you’re using, though, like woodworking dust extractors, we’d recommend going for a high-CFM model – at least 200 CFM – for the most effective cleanup.

Anti-Static Hose

And just like regular sawdust, the dust from MDF boards are just as prone to producing static electricity as it rides in and out of the dust extractor’s hose. The best way to prevent static electricity from sparking the sawdust without a chemical treatment or humidifier (static electricity enjoys dry environments) is by getting a dust extractor that’s compatible or comes with an anti-static hose.

Storage Capacity

Take a look at the storage compartment and see how many gallons the unit can hold. The ideal amount depends on the scale of work you’re doing – bigger projects would require a larger tank to reduce the number of times it needs to be emptied. However, if you don’t mind heading outdoors and dumping the sawdust and chips after every 30 or 40 minutes of work, a smaller 1- to 2-gallon tank would be okay.

Included Cleaning Attachments

Even though the dust extractor’s hose typically connects directly onto power tools, assuming that their ports are compatible, it’s still a good idea to find a model that comes with different cleaning attachments or are available for purchase. A long nozzle would work best at suctioning fallen debris that accumulates under and behind power tools.

Dust Extractor for Workshop Buying Guide

The final buying guide included in this article is on how to find the right dust extractor for any workshop. These dust extractors can handle basic sawdust and MDF dust without any issues but should also suction up all other sorts of airborne particles.

Class

What you do in your workshop will determine what sort of dust extractor you need. If you light-duty woodworking projects during the weekend, a smaller class M dust extractor would be fine. However, if you also like to dab in welding, painting, or mixing acrylic in your work, then a unit that retains class H dust might be the most appropriate model to get.

Wet/Dry

If your workshop is located in a basement or a garage, then wet cement, dirt, and dust may be something you’re very familiar with. Using a simple vacuum cleaner could prove to be ineffective and could actually end up becoming destroyed when its electronic components meet moisture.

Thankfully, there are wet/dry dust extractors for maximum cleaning abilities. After laying tiles, use a wet/dry dust extractor to pick up any residual pieces of tile mortar to give your workspace a thorough cleaning. These machines typically come with an auto-shutoff feature which kills the engine as soon as it detects heightened moisture levels in its storage compartment.

Maneuverability

Since dust extractors don’t use extremely long hoses that run along the walls of your workshop, it’s important that the tool can maneuver around tables and power tools to reach dirty spots.

Pay attention to the caster wheels; their size and construction should give you an idea of how well it travels from place to place in your workshop. Large, 4-plus-inch wheels are recommended for uneven terrain, but for your workshop, you can get by with smaller 3-inch wheels.

Storage Capacity

For a regular garage or basement workshop, a massive 10-gallon dust extractor will probably be overkill unless you spend most of your time working. But seeing as how a general-purpose dust extractor is used to clean up all sorts of messes, it’d be a good idea to have a larger tank – at least 4 gallons – to pick everything up off of your workshop’s floor without having to dump out the contents at an annoying frequency.

Attachments

The final thing to consider is the sort of attachments that the dust extractor comes with. Ideally, you should find a model that comes with or is compatible with upholstery-cleaning brushes, long nozzles, attachments for certain power tools (hammers, oscillating tools, routers, what have you).

Final Remarks

Dust extractors are perhaps the most versatile cleaning solutions available. Unlike shop vacs which are stationary units that rely on long hoses to reach every area of your workshop, dust extractors can be taken anywhere there’s dust and debris.

Finding the right dust extractor depends on what sort of work you do. The most common uses of dust extractors are for cleaning up wood-based residue, dust from chemically treated stock, and for general-purpose cleaning in workshops. In this article, we’ve split the buying guide into three sections which describe how to find the best dust extractor for each of these jobs.

For general woodworking, the dust extractor should deliver at least 150 CFM and be equipped to handle class M dust. It’d be nice if it was also equipped with HEPA-grade filters for extra protection against airborne-prone debris. Also, make sure that the unit comes with an anti-static hose to prevent sparks from igniting sawdust in and around the tool.

As for MDF, which is a type of wood-based material used in woodworking, the most appropriate dust extractor should handle class H dust, have an airflow volume of at least 200 CFM, and also be fitted with an anti-static hose. A dust extractor with class H dust filters can also be used for simple woodworking projects with or without the use of chemically treated boards.

The final buying guide talked about how general workshops that use wood, metal, cement, and chemicals would benefit most from a dust extractor designed to handle class H dust. If dealing with both wet and dry debris, a wet/dry dust extractor with moisture detection and auto-shutoff would be perfect.




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Bosch VAC090S 9-Gallon Dust Extractor Review

Managing dust and other debris is a tough job. The worst is when it goes airborne and blocks your vision or gets inside your lungs, which is infinitely worse. Though some power tools come with built-in dust management systems, they’re not always reliable, and sometimes the best solution would be to invest in an external tool to eliminate residue as it’s created.

Bosch VAC090S 9-Gallon Dust Extractor Review

The Bosch VAC090S is dust extractor that suctions dust away from the work surface as its produced. It’s a handy tool that comes with a large bucket to store debris and keep it from going airborne. We’ll be reviewing this product to see whether it lives up to the VAC series name.



Storage Capacity

The VAC090S has a 9-gallon capacity for storing dust, chips, dried and wet cement, and any other piece of debris that gets in the way. In our opinion, this is a tremendous amount of storage space and will most likely not requiring emptying out for at least a couple hours of work. It’s not the largest bin in a portable dust extractor, but it’s sufficient for even the most active construction projects.

Filter

This dust extractor comes with the VF100 pleated-paper filter which retains up to 99.9% of the captured particles 0.2 microns or bigger. This tool is also compatible with the VF120H HEPA-rated filters for trapping 99.9% of 0.3-micron particles or larger (sold separately). From our experience, the standard filter does an awesome job at grabbing hold of any debris at the job site. We highly recommend swapping out the VF100 for the HEPA-rated VF120H if you end up getting this tool.

Bosch VAC090S 9-Gallon Dust Extractor

Semi-Auto Filter Cleaning System

With a push of a button, you can command the VAC090S to start and stop cleaning the filter. This system blows quick gusts of air at the filter and sends whatever debris is clogging it straight to the bin. This feature effectively extends the lifespan of the filters to reduce the frequency of having to purchase new filters.

Suction Power

This tool comes with a 9.5-amp motor that delivers up to 150 CFM and 97.3 inches of water lift. That translates into a whole lot of suction power. For use at a home workshop, this might be overkill unless you’re working with larger pieces of debris (chips, shavings, and pieces of drywall). At construction sites, eliminating dry and wet cement as well as chips of mortar is easy to do if you have the VAC090S on hand.

This dust extractor also has a variable speed dial which lets users choose how much suction power to deliver. This feature comes in handy when moving from construction to woodworking job sites that require different CFM levels for adequate dust management. Theoretically, the speed dial is a good idea, but we found that there’s hardly any difference between LOW and HIGH suction mode.

Bosch VAC090S

Noise Level

On its highest speed setting (or only speed setting, however you want to look at it), the VAC090S generates only about 70 decibels of noise, similar to the noises produced by a vacuum cleaner. We admit that this isn’t the quietest portable dust extractor on the market, but since you’ll be wearing earmuffs and running power tools while this tool is on, you will hardly notice it.

Anti-Static Bend Nozzle

Oftentimes, sawdust or cement dust gets trapped in the very mechanism whose purpose is to eliminate the stuff once and for all. Thankfully, the VAC090S doesn’t have this problem. The suction hose and port are made of anti-static material so nothing will ever clog or stick to the inner lining of the tube. However, like other Bosch dust extractor models, the plastic port is either too thin or not durable enough and is prone to cracking.

Portability

The VAC090S sits four ruby wheels with plastic hubs which allow users to push or pull the unit to wherever it’s needed. We found this dust extractor glides effortlessly across smooth surfaces without any problems. The weight of the tool is only around 38 pounds so lifting it to different floors or areas in your workspace should not cause fatigue or pulled muscles.

Bosch VAC090S Review

Auto-Shutoff

Vacuuming wet debris can be a problem, even though wet/dry dust extractors are engineered to pick it up. This issue is eliminated thanks to the auto-shutoff system which detects the height of whatever wet contents is stored in the 9-gallon bucket. At a certain level, the machine will identify that the bin is full of moist debris and will automatically turn off to prevent damage.

Verdict

The large storage capacity, portability, and awesome suction power are just a few noteworthy things that should draw any professional construction worker or woodworker to the Bosch VAC090S. This is a great tool to take to the job site to deal with minuscule particles before they go airborne. There are some downsides to this tool such as the less-than-durable static-free nozzle and hose, but with care and proper storage, you can eliminate any durability issues once and for all.

Bosch VAC090S Dust Extractor Review




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Festool 574930 CT 26 E HEPA Dust Extractor Review

Woodworking and construction projects are messy work. Not only do sawdust and cement dust create a slipping hazard, but if inhaled, they could potentially prevent you from ever breathing normally ever again. The problem is that there is no deficiency of minuscule particles in woodshops and construction sites. The best thing you could do, apart from wearing the proper PPE, is to have a dust extractor on hand.

Festool 574930 CT 26 HEPA Dust Extractor Review (1)

Dust extractors are sort of like shop vacs, but they’re super-portable and can move around the job site easily. Festool has been one of the more popular dust extractor manufacturers, and it’s not hard to see why – German engineering and extreme attention to detail make all of their dust extractor models worthy of light- and heavy-duty dust control. The 574930 CT 26 from Festool has been praised heavily by woodworkers and construction workers alike, so let’s see if this tool really is deserving of all the applause it receives.



Suction Power

The CT 26 is equipped with a 10-amp motor that produces up to 137 CFM with a 97-inch water lift. Compared to other dust extractors, this isn’t the most powerful motor and suction power available, but it works well in picking up all sorts of debris. It also has a variable speed function which lets you adjust how much suction power the unit generates.

Festool 574930 CT 26 E HEPA Dust Extractor Review

Storage Capacity

The most annoying thing about cleanup has to be emptying the storage container, where all the dust and debris reside. What’s worse is when the dust extractor comes with a tiny dust compartment, meaning you’ll have to empty it frequently before resuming cleanup. The CT 26 comes with a 6.9-gallon compartment which is better-suited for smaller workshops. If your power tools produce a ton of debris, then the 6.9-gallon storage may feel a bit inadequate.

Wet and Dry Applications

This dust extractor can be used to pick up both wet and dry substances. This means it can be a great addition for woodshops and professional construction sites. The anti-static hose can be attached directly to woodworking power tools to suction up dust before it has a chance to go airborne, and by detaching the hose, you can use it to pick up wet cement and other moist debris.

Festool 574930 CT 26 E HEPA Dust Extractor

Auto-Shutoff for Safe Use

Moisture is not a power tool’s friend. Even the smallest droplet of water can wreak havoc on electrical components, which we why we’re glad that the CT 26 comes with an internal sensor that detects how much moisture is stored in the dust compartment. When moisture levels get too high, the motor will automatically shut off, indicating that it’s time to empty the bin.

HEPA-Grade Filtration

The CT 26 comes with a filter bag and a HEPA-grade filter with a 99.97% efficiency of capturing particles as small as 0.3 microns. HEPA filters are the best when it comes to preventing sawdust and cement dust from going airborne, reducing the risk of inhaling toxic substances and suffering from impaired vision.

Maximum Maneuverability and Portability

Many portable dust extractor models have maneuverability problems. Even though they’re lightweight and compact, their wheels can get clogged with dust, inhibiting its ability to glide across smooth surfaces. This problem does not exist in the CT 26 with its large wheels and two front casters. If you want to keep the unit stationary, simply tap on the foot brake to prevent the wheels from turning.

Festool 574930 Dust Extractor

Onboard Storage Compartment

When it comes time to put the CT 26 away, you don’t need to worry about where to store the hose. This dust extractor has an onboard garage where the hose and other accessories fit for maximum organization. This is also a helpful feature to have for worry-free transport. You’ll never forget the hose, additional HEPA filters and filter bags ever again.

Bluetooth Control

Even though this is a separate feature, it’s something that you should consider. You can purchase a Bluetooth module to control the CT 26 from a distance. Starting and shutting off the tool can be done with a push of a button. The module increases the convenience of the CT 26 and doesn’t improve the tool’s performance in any way, but it’s still a neat feature to have.

Verdict

Overall, we think that the 574930 CT 26 from Festool is a great dust extractor. The most notable things about this tool are its compliance to HEPA standards and the Bluetooth module. The suction power and storage capacity make the tool better designed for lighter-duty sites where dust and debris are not produced in huge quantities. However, for the DIY-er, the CT 26 is a pretty awesome tool to have.

Festool 574930 Review




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Festool 575267 HEPA Dust Extractor Review

Nothing’s more annoying than having to sweep up your workshop after a hard day of labor. What’s even worse is when operating your power tools just to have sawdust or cement dust go flying in the air and land in your hair, making you look 50 years older. One of the more reliable tools to get rid of dust and other tiny pieces of debris is a dust extractor – a portable tool that hooks up directly to power tools to suction up dust as it’s created.

Festool 575267 CT MIDI HEPA Dust Extractor

In this article, we want to take a close look at the 575267 Dust Extractor produced by the German company Festool. This unit has garnered a healthy number of positive reviews all over the internet and seeing as how this dust extractor was engineered by Festool, this is no surprise. Let’s check out what makes the 57267 such a popular choice among handymen and women.



HEPA Filters

The first thing we notice is that the 57267 comes with HEPA filters. If you don’t know, HEPA filters are the most advanced type of filter out there. They grasp onto 99.99% of particles 0.03 microns or larger. Sawdust, wood chips, wood shavings, and cement dust cannot pierce through HEPA filters at all.

Festool 575267 CT MIDI HEPA Dust Extractor Review

Container Capacity

The second thing we noticed is that this tool is rather small. When it comes to dust management, compactness isn’t always a good thing. The 57267 has a 3.9-gallon container that we found fills up pretty quickly. This means having to head to the compost heap or garbage bin to empty out the contents much too frequently for our liking. If you do heavy-duty construction or woodworking projects, then spending time emptying out the container can add up to too much wasted time.

Suction Power

This tool delivers up to 130 CFM of suction power and 96 inches of static water lift for picking up small to moderate pieces of debris. It’s not the most powerful dust extractor available, but most jobs, even heavier-duty ones, won’t require more than 130 CFM to pick up both wet and dry pieces of waste.

Festool 575267

Variable Power

Unlike so many other dust extractors out there, this tool has a functioning power variable dial. Turing this dial lets you adjust how much power the motor will generate. For more demanding jobs, crank it up to max power (130 CFM) to pick up any and every piece of dust, chip, and shaving of wood and dried cement.

Noise Production

Modern dust extractors are naturally quiet, but this Festool unit takes it a step further. Most of the time, you’ll find dust extractors generating around 90 decibels of noise, but the 57267, on HIGH mode, only produces about 72 decibels. However, you really won’t get a chance to enjoy the quietness of this tool or any dust extractor for that matter simply because the sound of your power tools will drown out any other sounds in the vicinity or fill any lack of sound in the vicinity. We’re just keeping it real…

Maneuverability

It’s important that a dust extractor is able to maneuver around the job site despite being tied down by its power cord. The first thing to consider when checking the maneuverability of a dust extractor is by checking its overall weight. The 57267 has a dry weight of only 19 pounds, making it one of the lightest dust extractors available. The second thing is to see how well the wheels are constructed. This tool has two large rear wheels made of plastic and two small caster wheels in the front. We found that the wheels help the tool glide seamlessly across smooth surfaces when both pushed and tugged.

Festool 575267 Review

Self-Cleaning Filter

The self-cleaning filter is a nice feature that extends the lifespan of each filter. When the machine detects a clog in the filter, it shoots a high-pressure burst of air at the filter to eliminate whatever waste is preventing a drop is suction power, send it to the bin and clean air outside of the tool. Since these are HEPA filters, there’s virtually no risk of any trapped dust getting shot back into the air of your room.

Verdict

In our humble opinion, the Festool 57267 is one of the best-performing portable dust extractors out there. Of course, coming from Festool, there was hardly any reason to doubt the unit, to begin with. The only issue we have is working in extremely dirty environments, frequently having to empty out the contents of the 3.9-gallon container can be a bit annoying, so we recommend using this tool for minor construction/renovation jobs. If you need a larger container, there are several great dust extractors on the market from Festool and other manufacturers.

Review of the Festool 575267 CT MIDI HEPA Dust Extractor




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Festool 574930 vs. 575267 HEPA Dust Extractors

Shop vacs are great, and all but they’re not exactly portable, nor are they suitable for picking up wet debris. For both wet and dry pickup, you’ll need a dust extractor, a vacuum-like tool that can connect to your power tools to suction up particle waste as they’re produced. Dust extractors are the best solution for dust management if you work at different job sites regularly.

Festool 574930 vs. 575267

Festool 574930

Festool has been one of the most popular producers of power tools in terms of quality, design, and usage. In this article, we’re going to compare two of the company’s most highly rated dust extractor models – the 574930 CT26 and the 575267 CT MIDI. Even though both of these are fantastic dust extractors, we’d like to find which of them would be the better option to invest in.



Suction Power

574930 CT 26
The first thing we need to consider is the suction power of the dust extractor. Larger motors offer more suction power, thus better dust and chip cleanup. The CT 26 comes with a 10-amp motor that generates 137 CFM of air volume with a 96-inch water lift.

575267 CT MIDI
The CT MIDI also features a 10-amp motor but has a slightly lower suction power rating of 130 CFM with 96-inch water lift. It still provides enough power to suck up dust and chips from your power tools before they go airborne.

Conclusion: The 7-CFM difference, as you can probably tell, is insignificant. They both can be connected to the same types of tools for picking up the same types of debris. They’re also both capable of picking up wet and dry substances so they can be great additions for woodshops and construction sites.

Festool 575267 vs. 574930

Festool 575267

Container Capacity

574930 CT 26
If you work professionally, then the concept of time can be quite sensitive. After all, you’re chasing a deadline and every second count. A small container means having to empty the dust extractor frequently, especially if you’re using routers, power sanders, and reciprocating saws. The CT 26 comes with a 6.9-gallon container which is far from being the largest on the market, but it’s still quite a lot of space to store debris.

575267 CT MIDI
This unit comes with a considerably smaller container. It can hold a maximum of 3.9 gallons of debris. We found that the container fills rather quickly regardless, and we had to dump the contents too frequently for our liking.

Conclusion: In our opinion, bigger is better. Thus, the CT 26’s large 6.9-gallon capacity is preferable to the CT MIDI’s 3.9-gallon bin. However, if you’re a weekend woodworking hobbyist who just needs something to pick up small quantities of dust, the CT MIDI would suit you fine without overkill.

Tool Weight and Maneuverability

574930 CT 26
Dust extractors, unlike shop vacs, roll around on wheels and can be taken to different job sites when needed. That’s why it’s important for them to be lightweight and have durable wheels for easy movement. The CT 26’s dry weight is 28.7 pounds, and it sits atop two front casters and two large rear wheels. This design really helps the unit glide effortlessly on almost any surface with a tug of the connected tool.

575267 CT MIDI
The CT MIDI has a dry weight of only 19.8 pounds and also features front casters and rear wheels, but they are considerably smaller in diameter compared to the CT 26’s. We’ve tried this tool out and found that even without large wheels, the tool can still move across almost all types of surfaces without any problems.

Festool 574930

Festool 574930

Conclusion: Both of these dust extractors can be considered lightweight, portable, and easy to maneuver. It’s important to know if you plan on working at large job sites or have your tools spaced far away from each other since the last thing you need is a dust extractor weighing you down.

Onboard Storage

574930 CT 26
Cleanup after cleanup is something that every professional is trained to do. The best tools are those that have onboard storage compartments to store all of the accessories to eliminate the risk of losing them. The CT 26 comes with a compartment to store the 11-1/2-foot-long anti-static hose so it never tangles or breaks. There’s also an onboard place to wrap the power cord behind the unit.

575267 CT MIDI
Like the CT 26, the CT MIDI has an onboard storage space for its 11-1/2-foot-long anti-static hose. It doesn’t come with a place for the power cord, though. Not a big deal since you can just place the cord in with the hose on top of the unit.

Conclusion: These two tools are identical in how they can store their long anti-static hoses. The power cord wrap is missing in the CT MIDI, but it is in no way a deal-breaker. Storing this unit when not in use is convenient, and you don’t need to worry about losing any of its accessories.

Festool 575267

Festool 575267

T-LOC Sys-Dock

574930 CT 26
Festool Systainers (sold separately) are storage bins that can be placed on top of certain Festool Dust Extractor models. The CT 26 has a T-LOC system which can lock multiple Systainers on top of the onboard hose garage for increased storage. This will come in handy at the worksite where you need to have multiple power tools on you at all times.

575267 CT MIDI
The CT MIDI doesn’t come with a T-LOC Sys-Dock. This unit is mainly designed for use in your home workshop or small job sites so if this tool fits your needs; you may not even need Systainers to begin with.

Conclusion: The T-LOC Sys-Dock system does nothing to enhance the performance of the tool, but it’s a neat feature if you’re a pro construction worker and need a place to store your power tools.

Festool 574930 HEPA Dust Extractor

Check how much you can save, buying the Festool 574930 on Amazon >>>

Verdict

There are clear discrepancies between the Festool 574930 CT 26 E HEPA Dust Extractor and the Festool 575267 CT MIDI HEPA Dust Extractor. First and foremost is the debris storage capacity in which the CT 26 has almost twice as much space as the CT MIDI. This is a clear indicator that the CT 26 is designed for use in professional worksites where sawdust and cement dust are produced in large quantities. Additional features in the CT 26 such as the designated space for the power cord and T-LOC Sys-Dock will help the most serious construction workers keep the unit organized and reduce the risk of breakage.

Festool 575267 HEPA Dust Extractor

Check how much you can save, buying the Festool 575267 on Amazon >>>




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

What is a Dust Collector & Do I Need One?

Whether you’re a professional craftsman working for a large commercial furniture maker or a weekend hobbyist, a buildup of dust and other wood debris can be a nuisance. Not only can it prevent the optimal performance of your power tools, but sawdust, chips, and shavings also pose a series of different health and safety hazards.

What is a Dust Collector

What Is a Dust Collector?

A dust collector is a piece of equipment that removes wood dust, chips, and shavings as soon as they’re produced. A dust collector connects directly to power tools and suctions up any residual matter. The substances are then stored in porous and/or plastic bags with extremely fine filters to prevent wood particles from escaping.

Is a Dust Collector Necessary?

For many furniture-building hobbyists and even professional workers at home, a proper dust management system might fall in the luxury category. This is understandable, of course, since a good dust collector for the workshop can cost upwards of $500 or even $1,000. However, here are a couple of reasons to help change your mind.

Dust Collector

Health Hazards

First of all, when sawdust goes airborne, it can lead to a number of different health problems, mostly concerning lungs and breathing. Back in the day, ancient dust collection systems used bags with 30-micron filters which easily let minuscule sawdust particles escape into the air. The ironic thing was that simply leaving the sawdust under the table and sweeping it away later was much safer, albeit still ineffective at preventing it from going airborne.

In 2002, sawdust was classified as not just an irritation but as a health risk. The US government placed the substance on the list of known carcinogens following a series of lung cancer cases among professional woodworkers.

Dust Collection

Injury

If you’ve ever had to run multiple boards through a thicknesser, especially when chasing a deadline, then you’ll know the hassle of taking out the broom and dustpan after each run. For the busy worker, it’s so much easier just to let the sawdust and shavings accumulate on the floor and sweep it up at the end of the day. Unfortunately, those shavings can become a slipping hazard if left to pile up even only centimeters thick.

Fire Hazard

We all know that wood is used as fuel to start a fire in a fireplace or pit. We also know that it’s easier for a log to catch fire when cutting into smaller pieces. The same logic applies to wood shavings, chips, and sawdust. It takes only a small spark from an angle grinder or miter saw to ignite sawdust left under or around said tools. In the rarest and most extreme cases, airborne sawdust can explode when in contact with flying sparks or heat.

What is a cyclone dust collector?

Better Working Experience

It’s so much easier to work in a clean environment than in a dirty one. A dust collector serves to eliminate as much dust and shavings as possible right as they’re produced from your power tools. Not only does it make your workspace clean, but it also helps preserve the sharpness of your tool’s blades and cutting performance since they won’t be obstructed by remaining wood residue.

Inexpensive Investment

We mentioned earlier that dust collectors could be rather costly to set up. For the most part, this is true, especially when looking at beefy, commercial models that require multiple yards of ductwork to connect to each and every power tool.

However, there are portable options that can be wheeled around the workshop and connected to various power tools when needed. Many single-stage dust collectors and even cyclone models won’t even leave a significant dent in the personal finances of a serious woodworker since they’ll help save time in the long run.

What is a dust collection system?

Bottom Line

Both professional and residential woodworking shops should have a dust collector. Dust collectors are perhaps one of the most important devices to have in a workshop since they remove sawdust, shavings, and chips right from the source.

The leftover wood particles and debris pose a number of different safety and health risks which, with the help of a reliable dust collector, is easy to reduce. However, it’s important to note that a dust collector is not a replacement for personal protective equipment (PPE).

Best Dust Collector: Buying Guide




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Shop Fox Dust Collector Comparison

A dust collector is a must-have device for every woodshop of any size. Any wood dust or shavings left in or around power tools can become a fire hazard, and when it goes airborne, it can potentially lead to an array of health problems. Dust collectors are one of the most effective tools for eliminating this problem since they suction up any chips, shavings, and dust as soon as they’re produced.

Shop Fox W1727 vs W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1727

In this article, we’re going to take a look at four of Shop Fox’s single-stage dust collectors – the W166, W1685, W1727, and W1826. Single-stage dust collectors are a suitable solution for workshops with limited space and power tools, though they could serve commercial woodworking shops just as well as their cyclone counterparts. All of these Shop Fox models feature 2.5 µ filters that capture and trap super-fine sawdust. The only thing left to answer is which of these models would suit your workshop bestLet’s find out.

CFM

W1666
The CFM rating indicates how much suction power the dust collector provides. Workshops with large tools that produce different wood residue should consider investing in dust collectors with a high CFM rating. The W1666 provides up to a massive 1,550 CFM of airflow, making it suitable for wood chips, shavings, and even wood dust.

Shop Fox W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 vs W1727 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1826

W1685
The CFM rating on the W1685 isn’t much different from the W1666. Its 1.5-HP motor moves up to 1,280 CFM of air. This provides ample power for all types of wood debris shooting out of your power tools.

W1727
The W1727’s 1-HP motor provides up to 800 CFM of air suction power. At this level, this device won’t be able to separate fine from coarse wood residue fully, but this device is still able to filter out at least 90% of the sawdust.

W1826
Of the four dust collectors here, the W1826 packs the least amount of suction power. The 1-HP motor on this compact device delivers up to 537 CFM, making it adequate for picking up shavings from thicknessers, but rather weak in suctioning sawdust.

Shop Fox W1727 vs W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1727

Conclusion: Deciding which of these is the best for you can be a bit tricky since it depends entirely on your arsenal of power tools, your work area, and the types of debris produced. However, the best overall solution would be the W1666 in terms of suction power since it works well on all sorts of debris. This is closely followed by the W1685 with its similar suction performance.

Static Pressure

W1666
Although portable dust collectors such as these Fox Shop models don’t need a setup of large ductwork, static pressure is still a factor that needs to be considered. The greater the static pressure rating (measured in inches of water in a water gauge), the more powerful the machine. The W1666 has a static pressure rating of 12.3 inches, making it able to overcome most static pressure issues you’re likely to have.

W1685
The W1685 has a static pressure rating of about 10.1 inches. The suction power won’t be as powerful as the W1666’s, but it’s still able to compensate for losses due to the friction caused by moving debris.

Shop Fox W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 vs W1727 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1685

W1727
The W1727, the most compact model of the four, has a static pressure rating of 5-2/3 inches. This doesn’t mean that it’s incapable at suctioning up dust and chips, but the hose connecting this machine to a power tool needs to be kept short and straight to eliminate friction and static pressure loss.

W1826
The W1826 provides 7.2 inches of static pressure. This is considerably more powerful than the W1727, though it’s also rather limited. However, for a compact dust collector for static power tools, this device should do the trick.

Conclusion: As we mentioned earlier, a higher static pressure rating is better since it shows how much strength the unit’s motor can lift and overcome losses due to static pressure. Both the W1666 and the W1685 provide sufficient static pressure ratings for eliminating all sorts of debris in the workshop, but the W1727 and the W1826 are enough for small-scale workshops with limited or static tools.

Shop Fox W1727 vs W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1727

What is a Dust Collector and Do I need One in my Workplace?

Portability

W1666, W1685, W1727
The best thing about compact dust collectors is that they can be used by multiple tools, either simultaneously or otherwise, without having to install large ductwork around your workshop. Instead, you can connect a short hose between the dust collector and the power tool you want to use. If you choose any of these three models, all you need to do is mount the device on a cart (included) and wheel it to whichever power tool station needs it.

W1826
One of the unique features of the W1826 is that, unlike the other models in this article, it can be mounted on a wall. The good thing is that it saves a lot of floor space. The bad thing is that it’s not portable so you’ll need to take your power tools to the dust collector and not the other way. However, for static power tools like mounted thicknessers or miter saws, this will suit them just fine.

Shop Fox W1727 vs W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1727

Conclusion: This depends entirely on your workshop’s design and location of power tools. The W1666, W1685, and W1727 work just like almost every other portable dust collector on the market – simply wheel it to where it’s needed. As for the W1826, your tools need to go to it.

Shop Fox W1666 vs W1685 vs W1727 vs W1826 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1666

Check how much you can save, buying the Shop Fox W1666 on Amazon >>>

Shop Fox Dust Collectors: Bottom Line

At the end of the day, none of these Shop Fox models can be a blanket solution for each and every woodworking shop. However, they are all extremely fine portable dust collectors that work well in almost every small-scale workshop. If your power tools produce both large and fine debris, then the powerful W1666 or W1685 could be a great solution for dust management.

If you mainly deal with small wood shavings and chips, either the W1272> or the W1826 could suit you just fine. The main thing to remember about the W1826 is that it won’t function properly without being mounted to a wall since the bag will end resting on the floor.

Shop Fox W1826 vs W1666 vs W1685 vs W1727 Dust Collector Comparison

Shop Fox W1826

Check how much you can save, buying the Shop Fox W1826 on Amazon >>>

Best Dust Collector: Buying Guide




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Best Dust Collector: Buying Guide

There are more risks in the workshop than just losing a finger. Without proper dust management, you’re exposing yourself to hazardous sawdust which, as of 2002, has been linked to various cancers (lung/throat). If you spend a lot of time in a wood workshop, then a dust collector can be one of the best investments you’ll ever make.

Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767 Dust Collector

Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767

Dust collectors capture sawdust before it reaches you, making it the most effective system for preventing dust particles from going airborne. Of course, a dust collector is not a direct substitute for PPE – you’ll still need to wear a respirator or a dust mask to prevent the inhalation of sawdust further.

What to Look for in a Dust Collector

There are several key elements that you should consider when shopping around for a dust collecting system.

Suction Power

The worst thing that can happen is investing heavily in a dust collector that doesn’t provide sufficient suction power for your workshop. The suction power of a dust collector is measured in cubic-feet-per-minute (CFM). The required CFM for your workshop will depend entirely on the different power tools in your workshop. Be sure to check the power tool’s manual or manufacturer’s website to determine how much CFM you need to pick up sawdust after use.

SHOP FOX W1685 Dust Collector

SHOP FOX W1685

Static Pressure

The static pressure measures how powerful the dust collector’s fan is. This is measured in inches of water using a water gauge which shows how far up water is lifted with a fan. Every elbow and each additional foot of the hose will add resistance to the suction power. You might need to purchase or find a model that comes with a long hose if you work in a large workshop where power tools are scattered in different spots of the shop.

Filter

The filter used in dust collectors should latch onto every dust particle and shred that comes flying out of your power tools. The dust collector should come with a filter that’s designed to capture the types of debris you have in your shop. Chips and shavings won’t require an ultra-fine filter to catch, but sawdust particles will.

Shop Fox W1826 Wall Dust Collector

Shop Fox W1826

Single-Stage or Cyclone Dust Collector

The type of dust collector you should get depends on the coarseness and/or fineness of the sawdust particles. Single-stage systems are relatively inexpensive but don’t separate coarse from fine particles so the bag will require constant emptying out. However, for small shops with limited tools and a form of wood residue, a single-stage dust collector will do just fine.

If you have a larger shop with a wide variety of power tools that produce all sorts of debris textures and sizes, as well as a more generous budget, you’ll need to invest in a larger, more tedious-to-set-up cyclone dust collector. One of the main benefits of a cyclone dust collector is that large chips won’t clog the filter, ensuring adequate suction power for picking up all types of wood residue.

Jet DC-1100VX-BK Dust Collector

Jet DC-1100VX-BK

What is a Dust Collector and Do I need One in my Workplace?

Which Dust Collector to Get

Now that we have the basic understanding of what to look for in a dust collector, it’s time to decide which setup to invest in. To help you make a decision, we’ve compiled a list of the top 5 best dust collectors for you to look through.

5 Shop Fox W1826 Wall Dust Collector

The first item on this list is the W1826 from Shop Fox. This device features a 1-HP motor that powers a large 10-inch impeller fan that provides up to 537 CFM of suction power. The W1826 comes with a 2-cubic-foot bag for holding onto large quantities of wood shavings and sawdust.

Shop Fox W1826 Wall Dust Collector

Shop Fox W1826

The filter is a super-fine 2.5 µ for capturing even the smallest sawdust particles. What makes this product unique is that it can be mounted on a wall to save floor space. This is a device for smaller workshops and users who don’t want the hassle of setting up large, lengthy ducts.

Check how much you can save, buying the Shop Fox W1826 on Amazon >>>

Shop Fox W1666 vs W1685 vs W1727 vs W1826: Dust Collector Comparison

4 Jet DC-1100VX-BK Dust Collector

The DC-1100VX-BK from Jet is an amazing single-stage dust collector that comes with a vortex cone for separating fine sawdust from larger pieces of debris like shavings and chips. The 1.5-HP motor delivers up to 1,280 CFM of suction power, making it a worthy choice if you have multiple power tools that produce a range of different forms of wood residue.

Jet DC-1100VX-BK Dust Collector

Jet DC-1100VX-BK

The tremendous 5.3-cubic-foot collector bag comes with a 10 µ filter for trapping particles and separating them filter-clogging debris. It features a Y-inlet which lets users connect two power tools to this dust collector – a handy addition that many woodworkers would definitely appreciate.

Check how much you can save, buying the Jet DC-1100VX-BK on Amazon >>>

3 SHOP FOX W1685 Dust Collector

The third-place spot goes to another of SHOP FOX’s superior dust collector models – the W1685. This model features a 1.5-HP motor that provides up to 1,280 CFM of air suction power with a static pressure rating of 10.1 inches. The foot-wide impeller fan suctions up any leftover messes from your power tools and separates fine sawdust up to 2.5 µ big from large-sized chips and shavings. The bags have a collective capacity of 5.3 cubic feet.

SHOP FOX W1685 Dust Collector

SHOP FOX W1685

This model also features a Y-inlet for connecting up to two power tools to this machine. This unit comes with a cart, but it can be used as a stationary dust collector if needed.

Check how much you can save, buying the SHOP FOX W1685 on Amazon >>>

2 Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767 Dust Collector

The 50-767 Dust Collector from Delta packs a 1.5-HP motor that delivers up to 1,500 CFM of suction power at an 8-inch static pressure rating. The filter that comes with this device is a super-fine 1 µ filter for separating extremely fine sawdust from larger particles and debris.

Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767 Dust Collector

Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767

The impeller fan spins at an impressive 3,450 RPM which helps to prevent the filter from becoming clogged with light wood chips. The cart that comes with this device makes it extremely portable and easy to glide across the floor. You can connect a single 6-inch hose to the device or, using the Y-inlet, connect up to two different power tools with 4-inch hoses.

Check how much you can save, buying the Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767 on Amazon >>>

1 Jet DC-1100VX-5M Dust Collector

Finally, our pick for the number one best home woodshop dust collector is, yet again, another one of Jet’s masterpieces – the DC-1100CX-5M. This dust collector comes equipped with a 1.5-HP motor that delivers up to 1,280 CFM and a static pressure rating of 10.5 inches of water. This model comes with a 5 µ filter that collects up to 5.3 cubic feet of fine wood dust.

Jet DC-1100VX-5M Dust Collector

Jet DC-1100VX-5M

The cart, that’s included with this machine, wheels around effortlessly. The Y-inlet lets you connect two 4-inch hoses for suctioning wood residue from two of your woodshop’s power tools simultaneously. The best thing about this machine is that it’s extremely quiet, producing roughly 70 to 80 decibels at any given time.

Check how much you can save, buying the Jet DC-1100VX-5M on Amazon >>>

Conclusion

Dust collectors are a vital device to have, in order to ensure safety when working in a woodshop. They don’t just keep our work areas clean and free from fire hazards, but they also prevent sawdust particles from going airborne and entering our lungs. Any woodshop – small and large – could benefit from a dust collector.

Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767 Dust Collector

Delta Power Equipment Corporation 50-767

Before heading to Amazon and picking up a dust collector, there are a number of factors that you should consider. The suction power and static pressure ratings indicate how powerful the dust collector is at picking up wood chips, shavings, and sawdust. However, without overkill, you’ll first need to determine how much power you need by checking your arsenal of power tool’s CFM requirements.

The size of the filter is also important since different power tools produce different types of wood leftovers. The smaller the filter in microns, the better it’ll be at separating large from small debris.

Finally, decide whether you want a single-stage or a dual-stage (a.k.a. cyclone) dust collector. The former can be inexpensive but limited in terms of separating wood debris, whereas the latter can be rather costly but handles debris separation automatically.

If you’re still undecided on which dust collector to get, we’ve given you our picks of the best 5 dust collectors to choose from. We feel that you can’t go wrong with either Shop Fox or Jet, but the model that takes the cake is the DC-1100VX-5M from Jet. The motor delivers a tremendous 1,500 CFM with a 3,450 RPM impeller fan that prevents large debris from blocking the super-fine 1 µ filter.

Jet DC-1100VX-5M Dust Collector

Jet DC-1100VX-5M

It’s a portable model that can wheel around your workshop with ease and, even at high power, produces only around 80 decibels of noise at max. Overall, it’s a reliable dust collector with superior performance for picking up after up to two power tools simultaneously with its Y-inlet with dual 4-inch connectors.




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

Shop Vacs vs Dust Extractors vs Dust Collectors

It’s of tremendous importance to have a proper dust collection system in place in any woodworking shop. The dust produced, if left under a machine, can become a fire hazard if sparks or excessive heat make contact with extremely flammable sawdust. In addition, airborne sawdust can get into your lungs and cause respiratory problems later on in life. However, it’s important to note that no matter how effective your dust collection system is, it is by no means a replacement for personal protective equipment like dusk masks with respirators.

Shop Vacs vs Dust Extractors

Generally speaking, there are three ways you can deal with sawdust and wood debris: shop vacs, dust extractors, and dust collectors. They all have their own set of pros and cons which we’ll discuss in this article. Moreover, one way of handling residual sawdust and debris isn’t a blanket solution for every power tool you possess. Depending on the size of the residue, one system will perform better compared to the others.

Dust Extractors vs Dust Collectors

What is a Shop Vac?

Shop vacs also referred to as wet/dry vacuums, are the most basic dust collection system you can use in your shop. It’s basically a vacuum that works best on small-sized debris in smaller quantities. It uses low air volume which travels quickly through a narrow hose.
Shop vacs work best for picking up sawdust and wood chips produces by handheld power tools. Most power tools today have ports where you can connect your shop vacuum hose to in order to pick up debris as it’s produced.

Most shop vacs use a one-stage system where all sorts of debris (microscopic dust and large-sized chips) are collected into a single tank. The tank doesn’t filter out the small from the large, and this could produce troubles to the tool’s motor down the road.

Vacmaster, VBV1210, 12 Gallon 5 Peak HP Wet/Dry...
  • 12 gallon polypropylene tank
  • 5 peak HP motor
  • Quick release detachable blower

Shop Vacs vs Dust Extractors vs Dust Collectors

What is a Dust Extractor?

Dust extractors have filterers that separate large-sized particles from microscopic ones. The fundamental difference between shop vacs and dust extractors is that dust extractors use high air volume which travels considerably slower through a wide hose. The wideness of the hose allows for larger-sized pieces of debris to travel through the hose and into the tank without blockage and causing engine trouble.

What is a dust collection system?

Dust extractors are extremely handy at suctioning particles in the air. They can come with filters that deal with microscopic dust particles (HEPA-grade ones can filter out particles as small as 0.3 µm 99.7% of the time).

Dust extractors are, generally speaking, an all-around dust collection system that can be used for both stationary power tools and handheld ones. In addition, for dust-producing tools like sanders, dust extractors are the most effective way of picking up any dust that falls to the ground as well as remains airborne.

Festool 575267 CT MIDI HEPA Dust Extractor
  • Constantly high suction because of the compact high performance turbine
  • Smooth suction hose and optimized sys-dock with cord holder and t-lock function for conveniently connecting...
  • Economical because of the optimal use of the available volume with a self clean filter bag in the container

Shop Vacs vs Dust Collectors

What is a Dust Collector?

Dust collectors work just like dust extractors (high volume, low suction power). The difference is that they require dedicated ports to function. This is what makes the work extremely well with stationary power tools like miter saws and wood thicknessers.

What is an electrostatic precipitator?

Like dust extractors, they work extremely well at picking up large amounts of dust and debris in a single pass. Shop vacs, due to their narrow hose and nozzle, are better-suited for picking up small amounts of troublesome dust in tight-fitting spots.

Best Dust Collector: Buying Guide

What separates a dust collector from a dust extractor is its ability, or lack thereof, at suctioning airborne pollutants. Although they utilize a two-stage mechanism that separates large debris from small particles, they aren’t designed to filter the air since they’re connected directly to the sawdust exit port of stationary power tools.

What is the CFM of a shop vac?

Sale
SHOP FOX W1727 1 HP Dust Collector
  • Motor: 1 HP, 120V/240V, single-phase, prewired 110V
  • Motor amp draw: 9A/4.5A
  • Air suction capacity: 800 CFM

What is a Dust Collector and Do I need One in my Workplace?

How to measure the effectiveness of a shop vac, dust extractor, and dust collector

The same calculations and variables are required to measure the effectiveness of each dust collection system. First, we have to look at the volume of air that the unit suctions up (cubic-feet-per-minute, CFM). This determines how effective the unit is at picking up potentially airborne particles, keeping them in the hose, and delivering them to the tank. Generally speaking, a higher CFM means greater versatility. For instance, wood thicknessers produce wood shavings that require around 500+ CFM to pick up sawdust from sanders requires around 100+ CFM.

The next variable used in measuring effectiveness is the static water lift count. This simply measures how far water can travel up a 2-inch hose with the suction power of a shop vac, dust extractor, or dust collector. The higher the static water lift count, the more effective the unit will be at picking up large-sized chips and shavings.

What is a cyclone dust collector?

Conclusion

There are several other considerations you should make before purchasing a shop vac, dust extractor, or dust collector, but the CFM and static water lift counts are the most important variables to pay attention to.

In a nutshell, a shop vac is better than nothing and works better with handheld power tools; a dust collector works better for static power tools like miter saws and planers that produce large amounts of sawdust, and a dust extractor does it all with the addition of filtering the air in your workshop.

Best HEPA Dust Extractors: Buying Guide and Top 5

3 Recommended Shop Vacuums


Bestseller No. 1
DeWALT DXV09P 9 gallon Poly Wet/Dry Vac, Yellow
  • Sturdy 9 gallon wet/dry Vac ideal for large pick-up applications 9 gallon Poly container
  • Powerful 5 peak horsepower motor provides just the amount of suction needed to most any cleanup job
  • Ultra durable rubberized casters allow smooth swiveling for ease of movement
Bestseller No. 2
CRAFTSMAN CMXEVBE17595 16 Gallon 6.5 Peak HP...
  • HEAVY-DUTY: Powerful 6.5 peak HP provides extra power for large projects in the garage, shop and on the...
  • BUILT-IN BLOWER PORT: Rear blowing port on this wet dry vac allows for quick cleaning of leaves and grass...
  • OVERSIZED DRAIN: Built-in oversized drain on the wet/dry vac allows for convenient emptying of liquids
SaleBestseller No. 3
Bissell, Red, MultiClean Wet/Dry Garage and Auto...
  • Powerful 11 amp motor for excellent wet and dry cleaning
  • 6 gallon capacity to get the job done whether big or small
  • Includes a blowing function, for clearing dirt and debris from porches, garages and doorways; or even to blow...




Categories
Cleaning Dust Extractors

FEIN vs. Festool HEPA Dust Extractors

Dust extractors are handy tools for keeping the workplace of woodworkers clean. It’s important to maintain cleanliness in an environment where sawdust and wood debris can be a fire hazard and be potentially harmful to your health. Some woodworkers opt to use traditional vacuum cleaners to pick up leftover chips or dust on the floor, but this can damage the narrow hose and limited motor of the vacuum cleaner.

FEIN Turbo II vs Festool 583492 HEPA Dust Extractor Comparison

FEIN Turbo II

Since power tools and woodworking machines produce tremendous amounts of sawdust, we want a tool that can clean up after us without taking too much time (a limitation of vacuum cleaners due to their narrow air flow). This is where dust extractors reign supreme.

In this article, we’re going to take a look at two highly-regarded dust extractors – the FEIN Turbo II and the Festool 583492. Both of these models use HEPA-grade filters to capture at least 99.7% of particles as small as 0.3 µm. Let’s dive right into our comparison of these two dust extractors.

Festool 583492 vs FEIN Turbo II HEPA Dust Extractor Comparison

Festool 583492

CFM and Water Lift

FEIN Turbo II
The two measurements used to rate the suction power of a dust extractor is by measuring air flow (cubic-feet-per-minute, CFM) and water lift. The latter refers to how many inches the unit can suck up water before gravity prevents it from going any further. The FEIN delivers up to 151 CFM of air volume and 98.4 inches of static water lift. CFM-wise, this unit performs admirably in keeping airborne particles inside of the hose and delivers them into the tank or bag. The high water lift count means that it can pick up leftover shavings from planers.

Festool 583492
The Festool delivers slightly less suction power – only 137 CFM – and up to 96 inches of water lift. For home woodshops, the CFM and water lift is the proper amount of picking up after power tools, though we wish it could deliver greater power. Basically, anything over 130 CFM will keep tiny particles from dropping back down onto the floor.

Conclusion: Between the FEIN and the Festool, it’s clear that the FEIN delivers greater suction power. However, the average DIY-er’s workshop may not have heavy machinery like planers so 130 CFM may be the ideal suction strength to have. In any case, more is better, and the FEIN wins because it can handle more.

FEIN Turbo II vs Festool 583492

FEIN Turbo II

Cord Length and Hose

FEIN Turbo II
Professional-grade dust extractors are huge machines that are placed in one spot in a workshop. The user just navigates the flexible hose from tool to tool to ensure proper clean-up. Although these models are lightweight and portable, we consider the length of the power cord and hose to contribute to the overall easy-to-use-ness of the unit. The FEIN has an 18-foot power cord and a 13-foot hose. It should be noted that the hose is not anti-static, meaning that in order to prevent static electricity buildup, the unit should be grounded properly.

Festool 583492
The Festoon, on the other hand, has an amazingly long power cord (32.7 feet), though the hose is shorter than the FEIN (11.5 feet). However, the hose of the Festoon is anti-static to prevent unwanted fires in the hose (rarely occurs, but a risk, nonetheless) and machine.

Conclusion: The super-long length of the cord and hose make the Festoon more portable, but it also allows users to leave the unit in the corner of their workshop while pulling the hose to each and every power tool they have. Although these units and lightweight and compact, it’s still annoying having to drag the unit from place to place to clean up sawdust and wood shavings.

Festool 583492 vs FEIN Turbo II

Festool 583492

Auto-Clean HEPA Filter

FEIN Turbo II
HEPA filters can be quite costly to replace. When working in an environment where sawdust roams freely, you may need to purchase replacement HEPA filters frequently to keep up with the never-ending torrent of sawdust produced from your machines. Unfortunately, the FEIN doesn’t have an auto-cleaning feature that extends the life of your HEPA filter.

Festool 583492
Fortunately, the Festoon does. The auto-cleaning feature means that the HEPA filter can be used for longer before purchasing replacements. In addition, maintaining a clean filter produces more consistent suction power for longer. The self-cleaning mechanism isn’t exactly perfect, but it’s better than nothing (especially since the bags the filters are disposable).

Conclusion: It’s clear that the Festoon 583492’s auto-cleaning feature is superior to FEIN’s non-existent one. In addition, neither of these units requires having to replace the filters when they touch the water.

FEIN Turbo II

FEIN Turbo II

Variable Speed Dial

FEIN Turbo II
The reason for changing suction power is to save energy. You don’t want a constant maximum CFM for picking up the smallest pieces of debris that require only around 100 CFM, but unfortunately, that’s what you’re stuck with when you get the FEIN. It delivers a constant 151 CFM all day long, and it produces the same noise output for all tasks.

Festool 583492
As for the Festool, you can spin a dial for selecting how much power you need. For sucking up sawdust, you can get by with a low CFM count, but larger debris needs increased power. The Festool gives you to option to save energy for light-duty tasks or use more energy for more demanding ones.

Festool 583492

Festool 583492

Conclusion: The Festool’s variable speed dial is obviously a great feature to have. Not only does it save energy, but you’re also producing less noise when dealing with light-duty suction jobs.

FEIN Turbo II vs Festool 583492 HEPA Dust Extractor Comparison

Check how much you can save, buying the FEIN Turbo II on Amazon >>>

FEIN Turbo II vs Festool 583492: Bottom Line

Even though the FEIN Turbo II is the more powerful model, it isn’t as portable and versatile as the Festool 583492. The long power cord and anti-static hose give users the comfort of placing the unit in one location while navigating the hose from power tool to power tool. The auto-clean feature is also great to have since it extends the life of the HEPA filter and guarantees optimal suction power for every application.

The speed dial is also a nice touch, and users have the freedom to reduce the suction power for picking up sawdust or increase the power for sucking up wood shavings and other debris. Between these two models, the Festool 583492 is obviously the better HEPA dust extractor to have in your workshop.

Festool 583492 vs FEIN Turbo II HEPA Dust Extractor Comparison

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